Jessica Chen

Wired! Fellow
Class of 2020 | Planning to declare Double Major in Art History & Economics

Jessica Chen is currently a first-year studying art history and economics at Duke University. She is involved in the Alife Arch project with Professor Bruzelius, and works specifically on historical mapping. Jessica is interested in provenance studies and researches the classical collection at the Nasher Museum of Art.


Projects

Alife Arch App

Lizzet Clifton

Wired! Fellow
Class of 2019 | Major in Visual and Media Studies & Italian and European Studies, Certificate in Arts of the Moving Image

Lizzet Clifton is currently a sophomore at Duke University. She intends to double major in Visual and Media Studies and Italian and European Studies, along with earning a certificate in Arts of the Moving Image. She began her work in the Wired! Lab the Fall of 2016, working with Kristin Lanzoni’s project of the Jacopo de’Barbari map of 16th century Venice. Lizzet is one of the animation developers on this undertaking, and she hopes to continue with animation in the future.


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Sheila Dillon

Professor of Art History and Classical Studies
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Sheila Dillon received a Ph.D. in Classical Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She teaches courses on Greek and Graeco-Roman art and archaeology. Her research interests focus on portraiture and public sculpture and on reconstructing the statuary landscape of ancient cities and sanctuaries. Her books include The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010); Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, and Styles (2006), which was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2008; Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (2006); and an edited volume A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012). Professor Dillon was a member of the Aphrodisias Excavations in Turkey from 1992-2004, has worked at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace, and now spends summers doing fieldwork in Athens. Her current projects include a history of portrait sculpture in Roman Athens, which examines the impact of Roman rule and Roman portrait styles on Athenian portraiture, and a digital mapping project of the archaeology of Athens, a collaborative endeavor centered in the Wired! Lab that involves undergraduate and graduate students at Duke and international colleagues in Athens. Professor Dillon was the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology from 2013-2016.


Courses

Wired!

Art & Archaeology of Ancient Athens  Spring 2014 | Spring 2017


Projects

Aphrodisias

Death, burial and commemoration in Athens from antiquity to the late 19th century

Digital Athens

Delos

Statues Speak


Publications & Presentations

Books & Book Chapters

Dillon, Sheila, and Timothy Shea. “Statues as Artifacts: Towards an Archaeology of Greek Sculpture.” Greek Art In Context: Archaeological and Art Historical Perspective. Routledge, 2017. 19-29.

Articles

Dillon, Sheila, and Elizabeth Palmer Baltes. “Honorific Practices and the Politics of Space on Hellenistic Delos.” American Journal of Archaeology 117 (2013): 207-46.

Presentations

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Alexandra Dodson

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2016
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Alexandra Dodson is a PhD candidate working with Prof. Caroline Bruzelius. Alexandra’s research is focused on the artistic and architectural patronage of the Carmelite Order in central Italy in the 13th and 14th centuries. She is interested in the use of digital technologies for the visualization of historic materials and is a contributor to Visualizing Venice, an international collaborative using technologies to illustrate the urban and architectural history of Venice. Alexandra received a BA in Art History with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2006.


Courses

Wired!

The Museum Inside Out

Rock, Paper, Chisel: The Materiality and Context of Medieval Art


Projects

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)


Publications & Presentations

Dodson, Alexandra and Erica Sherman. “Visualizing Venice.” Poster presentation. College Art Association Annual Conference. Los Angeles, CA. February 22-25, 2012.

Sherman, Erica and Alexandra Dodson. “Visualizing Venice: Tracking Historical Change with New Technologies.” ICERI (International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation). Madrid, Spain. November 14-16, 2011.

Iara Dundas

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Iara Dundas is a doctoral student in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University studying the architecture of Early Modern France and Italy. Iara earned her B.A. in Art History from the University of Central Florida in 2007 and an M.A. (with distinction) in Art History from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2010.  She is particularly interested in ephemera and the relationship between temporary structures and permanent structures, especially within the context of court and religious festivals and spectacles. Other areas of research include the history and architecture of theater and performance, the Early Modern Jesuits, and the intersections of art and science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.


Courses

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

The Museum Inside Out

Splendor of the City: The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Venice


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)

Venice Virtual World

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Dundas, Iara and Elizabeth Narkin. “How Can Visualization Technologies Help Us to Teach and Learn Architectural History?” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC). Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Emma Durham

Wired! Fellow

Emma is an undergraduate fellow in the Wired! Lab working on Paris of Waters.


Projects

Paris of Waters

Amanda Fetter

Humanities Writ Large Fellow
Class of 2015 | Major in Classical Civilization, Minor in Art History & Religion

I am currently in my third year of undergraduate study at Duke University, working towards obtaining a BA in Classical Civilization. In addition to my connection with Classics at Duke, I also have ties to both the Religion and Art History departments, in which I am minoring. My interests lie in using archaeology as a tool for understanding the various roles of religion in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Presently, I am planning on studying abroad in Rome for the upcoming semester and hopefully increasing my archaeological experience through excavating somewhere in Italy or Greece next summer. At the culmination of my undergraduate career I plan on pursuing a PhD in Classical Archaeology.


Projects

Death, Burial, and Commemoration in Athens

Stephanie Fiddy

Wired! Fellow
Class of 2018 | Major in Visual & Media Studies, Minor in Computer Science

Stephanie Fiddy is a senior at Duke University majoring in Visual Media Studies and minoring in Computer Science. Stephanie is currently collaborating on the Operating Archives project with the aim being to create an engaging web space that allows users to interact with 3D renditions of the 17th century anatomical ivory mannequins found in Rubenstein Library’s Trent Collection.

Throughout her time at Duke, Stephanie has been interested in the intersection between Computer Science and the Humanities. She has previously worked on Visualizing Venice and Venice Interactive Visual Atlas. Outside of the Wired! Lab, Stephanie has had internships as a graphic designer at The Miami Heat and as a software engineer at Altegra Healthcare.


Projects

Operating Archives

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Maurizio Forte

William and Sue Gross Professor of Classical Studies Art, Art History, & Visual Studies
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My scientific activity has been particularly focused from the beginning on a strong multidisciplinary approach to the development of virtual heritage and digital archaeology. During my degree, MA, PhD and Specialization in Archaeology I have always integrated traditional courses in Ancient Art History, Etruscology, Roman and Greek Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology, Papirology, Egyptology, Pre-Colombian Archaeology, and Ancient Topography with more experimental activities in computing labs and with the use of digital technologies. I have started to use computer applications in archaeology in the early 80s during my degree in Ancient History. At that time, I was particularly attracted by the idea that digital computing could changed the methodology of research in archaeology and, in general, in the humanities. For this reason, I spent ten years working in a Supercomputing Center in Italy (CINECA, Bologna, http://www.cineca.it/en) co-fouding with other colleagues the Visual Lab, one of the first labs in Europe dedicated to visual applications and image processing in archaeology and cultural heritage. It was a very pionering experience focused on the use of techniques of computer vision for the reconstruction of artifacts, monuments and sites. All this work was aimed at integrating technology with field work data from cultural heritage sites. I define “virtual heritage” as the digital information that is derived from a physical site, whether it is an object, monument, territory, or landscape. This information must be processed both by computer programs but also, and more importantly, by our perceptions, interpretations, knowledge, cultural awareness and finally communicated through dissemination. The research in which I have been most involved is concerned with the reconstruction of archaeological and ancient landscapes in a virtual format. This has meant working with digital technologies such as 3D documentation, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, spatial technologies, open software WEB-VRGIS and virtual reality. Having created a virtual reconstruction, my efforts were then directed to the epistemology of this form of presentation, one aspect of eco-anthropological thinking. I have coordinated archaeological projects in Italy, Ethiopia, Egypt, Oman, India, China, Honduras, Mexico, Spain and Turkey, always integrating theoretical approaches and new methodologies of research.