Henrietta Miers

MA Candidate in Historical and Cultural Visualization | Class of 2015

I am a first year MA student in the Historical and Cultural Visualization program. I received my BA in art history at Princeton University, where I took a variety of classes in different branches of art history. I wrote my senior thesis on the British-Nigerian contemporary artist Yinka Shonibare’s Fake Death Series. I compared and contrasted Shonibare’s photographs to the original paintings he used, while looking at the literal and metaphorical death that appear in both. During my summers I interned for Maya Lin, transcribing videos for her What is Missing Project? I also interned at the SOHO gallery, Deitch Projects, and at Daniel Wolf’s studio.


Projects

Troyes Cathedral: Stained Glass

Elisabeth Narkin

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies | Graduated 2017
| website || contact |

Elisabeth Narkin is a PhD candidate in Duke University’s Department of Art History and Visual Studies, where she studies the architecture of Early Modern France. Elisabeth received her B.A. summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in Art History and French from Boston College in 2007 and an M.A. in Art History from The George Washington University in 2009. Her research interests include French court society, architectural spaces for royal children and families, and the convergence of public and private spaces.

In addition to working with Wired!, Elisabeth is currently researching and writing her dissertation, “Rearing the Royals: Architecture and the Spatialization of Royal Childhood in France, 1499-1610,” which analyzes the manner in which the social life of the French court and royal family unfolded in the architectural spaces of châteaux located in and around Paris.


Courses

The Museum Inside Out


Projects

On with their Heads: Creation, Destruction, and Digital Recontextualization

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Dundas, Iara and Elizabeth Narkin. “How Can Visualization Technologies Help Us to Teach and Learn Architectural History?” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC). Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Charlie Niebanck

Wired! Fellow


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Jordan Noyes

MA Candidate in Historical and Cultural Visualization | Class of 2015
Class of 2014 | Major in Art History

Jordan Noyes is an MA student in the Historical and Cultural Visualization program. Her research interests focus on using digital technologies to visualize and analyze traditional art historical research. Jordan has collaborated on many Wired! lab projects including Visualizing Venice and Digital Athens, learning to work with Omeka, Neatline, and QGIS/ArcGIS, while still using archival research methods. This exposure to the Wired! projects led her to an undergraduate thesis that looked at the representations of street art in archives, how ephemeral art is remembered, and the importance of space to street art through a written paper and visual map/timeline.

Read more about Jordan.


Projects

Augmenting Urban Experiences

Digital Athens

Duke/Durham Ghosts

Visualizing Venice

Michael O’Sullivan

Research Assistant, The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database
Class of 2017 | Major in Psychology

Michael O’Sullivan is from Garden City, NY. He attended Chaminade High School in Mineola, NY and earned a degree in Psychology from Duke in 2017. He is working on the Kingdom of Sicily database researching world war II photography of monuments from southern Italy.

 



Projects

The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database

Chelsea Pieroni

Humanities Writ Large Fellow
Class of 2014 | Major in Philosophy, Certificate in Information Science + Information Studies

I am senior from Florence, Italy, majoring in Philosophy and completing a certificate in Information Science and Information Studies (ISIS). As a Wired! Fellow I am involved in the Visualizing Venice project, in which I will be modeling 3D images of Venetian buildings, both current and past, that have been ruined throughout the centuries. I will also be contributing to the experience through research in my native tongue, Italian. My academic goal – and life goal, I suppose – is to unite the humanities and the sciences, particularly the classics, visual art, and technology, which all beautifully come together in our Venice-focused project. Ultimately after graduation I aspire to continue to pursue this goal and work creatively in scientific and technological environments.


Projects

Venice Virtual World

Visualizing Venice

Jessica Pissini

MA Candidate in Historical and Cultural Visualization | Class of 2015
| website |

Jessica Pissini is a second year MA student in the Historical and Cultural Visualization program. She double majored at Penn State University, studying Integrative Arts/Visual Studies and Classical/Ancient History and Archaeology. After graduation, Jessica continued her position as a graduate assistant and site photographer on the Mendes Excavation team in Egypt through 2012. Now at Duke, she has been studying ancient and medieval art and architecture, and contributing to a handful of Wired! Lab projects. In January, Jessica worked with master sculptor Simon Verity and a team of students and professors to create a facsimile of a Nasher Museum artifact and to better understand the process of stone carving and traditional tools. Her MA thesis project, Decoding Artifacts, is a continuation of her work with Simon which explores ways to digitally research, visualize and learn about museum objects through virtual tools and applications.

Read more about Jessica.


Projects

Decoding Artifacts

Duke/Durham Ghosts

The Lives of Things

Talking Heads

Julian Salazar

Wired! Fellow


Projects

Digital Athens

Justin Sandulli

Wired! Fellow
Class of 2016 | Major in Art History, Minors in Music and Visual & Media Studies

Justin Sandulli, a junior, is pursuing a major in Art History with minors in Music and Visual & Media Studies. As a Wired! fellow, he has participated in Professor Sheila Dillon’s Digital Athens initiative; his contributions thereto include documenting the find spots & subject matter of Athenian grave steles and researching the waterways that enabled life in the ancient city. Independently, he is interested in curatorial practice, Mannerism and the Early Baroque in Italy, and interbellum Hawaiiana. At Duke, Justin chairs the Duke University Union Visual Arts Committee (DUU VisArts) and concurrently serves as duARTS’s Vice President of Collaboration and the Nasher Student Advisory Board’s Campus Outreach Chair. Beyond the Gothic Wonderland, he has interned for Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and is a volunteer tour guide at the North Carolina Museum of Art.​


Projects

Digital Athens

Jared Schwartz

Wired! Fellow
Class of 2016 | Major in Computer Science

Developing a web platform to visualize the 16th century drawing of Venice by Jacopo de’ Barbari.


Projects

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)