Iara Dundas

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Iara Dundas is a doctoral student in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University studying the architecture of Early Modern France and Italy. Iara earned her B.A. in Art History from the University of Central Florida in 2007 and an M.A. (with distinction) in Art History from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2010.  She is particularly interested in ephemera and the relationship between temporary structures and permanent structures, especially within the context of court and religious festivals and spectacles. Other areas of research include the history and architecture of theater and performance, the Early Modern Jesuits, and the intersections of art and science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.


Courses

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

The Museum Inside Out

Splendor of the City: The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Venice


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)

Venice Virtual World

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Dundas, Iara and Elizabeth Narkin. “How Can Visualization Technologies Help Us to Teach and Learn Architectural History?” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC). Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Nikos Gkiokas

PhD Student in Art, Art History & Visual Studies

I am a PhD candidate focusing on Greek and Roman Art/Archaeology. My main area of interest is Archaic Greek sculpture and architecture. Other interests include cultural interactions in the late Bronze Age and Iron Age Mediterranean, ancient religiosities in the Aegean and Mediterranean from the Bronze Age to Christianity, reception of antiquity in the medieval Byzantine Empire and modern-day Greece, theory of art history and archaeology. I have worked and volunteered in various archaeological fieldwork projects (Azoria, Methoni, Meganissi, Gaudos, Eleftherna, Kos, Arcadia, Athens, Salamis, Piraeus, Agios Georgios, and Volos). Currently, I am working on the Digital Athens Project in the Wired! Lab.


Courses

The Art & Archaeology of Ancient Athens


Projects

Digital Athens

Sinan Goknur

PhD Candidate in Visual and Media Studies

Sinan Goknur is a practice-based Visual and Media Studies PhD student at Art, Art History and Visual Studies Department. In addition to his practice in media production and design, Sinan’s intellectual interests include contemporary art theory, modernity/coloniality critique, global epistemologies of resistance, and critical technology studies.


Courses

Wired! The Lives of Things


Projects

The Lives of Things

Amanda Lazarus

PhD Student in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Amanda Lazarus is a PhD student in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, studying Hellenistic and Roman sculpture. She earned her B.A. in Art History/History from McGill University (2008) and M.A. in History of Art from the University of Bristol (2010). Her research interests include Greek portraiture of the Archaic through Hellenistic periods, female euergetism in the Greek East, and the sculptural output of Roman Athens, whose loci of production she aims to track utilizing digital methods. Amanda is a member of the Digital Athens Project.


Projects

Digital Athens

Timothy Shea

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Timothy Shea is a PhD student in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies. His interests include Classical Attic funerary sculpture, interactions between different peoples in colonial and urban contexts, ancient urban development, and communal dining practices in ritual, civic, and domestic contexts. He has done archaeological fieldwork in Athens, Crete, and Sicily and always looks to incorporate archaeological fieldwork and the visualization of material retrieved in fieldwork in his research. He is currently working on the Digital Athens Project in the Wired! Lab.


Projects

Digital Athens


Publications & Presentations

Book Chapters

Dillon, Sheila, and Timothy Shea. “Statues as Artifacts: Towards an Archaeology of Greek Sculpture.” Greek Art In Context: Archaeological and Art Historical Perspective. Routledge, 2017. 19-29.

Presentations

Baltes, Elizabeth P., Caroline Bruzelius, Hannah L. Jacobs, and Timothy Shea. “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum.” Intermezzo Speaking Series, Art, Art History & Visual Studies. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 29, 2015.

Joseph Williams

PhD Candidate in Art, Art History & Visual Studies
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Joseph Williams is a Ph.D. Candidate in Art History at Duke University. Under the guidance of Dr. Caroline Bruzelius, he has studied 12th- and 13th-century architecture in Southern Italy, with a particular focus on construction techniques and pan-Mediterranean exchanges of specialized technology. Williams holds a BA from Bates College and a Master’s degree in art history from the Courtauld Institute of Art.

Williams’s dissertation Mediterranean Trade and Architectural Production: The Church of S. Corrado in Molfetta (Apulia) ca. 1100-1300 CE considers how the expanding trade and communications of the medieval Mediterranean transformed the industry of large-scale church building. Through a mixed method of construction archaeology and comparative analysis, he examines the financial structures, building process, and technical specializations revealed by the written and material evidence of a single church. Williams has received a number of awards and fellowships to support his research, including a Phyllis W. G. Gordan/Lily Auchincloss/Samuel H. Kress Foundation pre-doctoral Rome Prize at the American Academy in Rome (September 2016 – July 2018).

A long-term collaborator in the Wired! Lab at Duke, Williams uses various digital technologies in his dissertation, including a GIS (geographic information system) to trace patterns in the use of specific architectural techniques. As project manager of the Kingdom of Sicily Image Database, Williams has researched and edited information relevant to the historic images and buildings featured on the website, coordinated a student team to seek out relevant image collections in the United States, and organized institutional outreach, including a site visit to the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Williams is currently training new collaborators in the use of the database and participating in the presentation of the website at conferences.


Courses

Introduction to Art History


Projects

The Alife Arch

The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Database


Publications & Presentations

Database

Medieval Kingdom of Sicily: A Database of Monuments and Sites. Project Director: Caroline Bruzelius; Project Managers: Paola Vitolo and Joseph C. Williams; Project Collaborators: Gabriella Cianciolo, Francesco Gangemi, Luciana Mocciola, Ruggero Longo, Alba Irollo; Metadata and Image Management Consultant: John J. Taormina; Technical Consultant and Database/Web Developer: David Tremmel.

Dissertation

Williams, Joseph C. “Mediterranean Trade and Architectural Production: The Church of S. Corrado in Molfetta (Apulia) ca. 1100-1300 CE.” PhD dissertation, forthcoming.