Caroline Bruzelius

Co-PI, The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Image Database | Director Emeritus, Wired! Lab | Anne M. Cogan Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
| CV || website || contact |

Caroline Bruzelius works on architecture, sculpture, and urbanism in the Middle Ages. She has published on French Gothic architecture (for example, the abbey church of St.-Denis and Notre Dame in Paris) as well as on medieval architecture in Italy, in particular Naples in the 13th and 14th centuries (in both English and Italian editions). She recently published a book on Franciscan and Dominican architecture, Preaching, Building and Burying. Friars in the Medieval City (Yale U. Press, 2014). Bruzelius has also published numerous articles on the architecture of medieval nuns and architectural enclosure, an area in which she did pioneering work.

Her 1991 catalogue of the Brummer Collection of Medieval Sculpture at Duke, is now being revisited as a series of interactive display installations being developed in collaboration with Mark Olson. She has been awarded numerous grants and prizes, including grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Max-Planck Institute (Hertziana Library), and the Fulbright Association. She is former Director of the American Academy in Rome, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and at the Medieval Academy. Bruzelius is co-Director of a database on images of the monuments in medieval Kingdom of Naples, and is working on two new studies: a book called “The Cathedral and the City,” and a general study of architecture in the Medieval Kingdom of Sicily.

 

 


Courses

Gothic Cathedrals

Introduction to Art History

The Mendicant Revolution

The Museum Inside Out 

Wired!


Projects

Alife Arch App

Eremitani

The Medieval Kingdom of Sicily Database

The Lives of Things

Sta. Chiara Choir Screen

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Books & Book Chapters

Bruzelius, Caroline. Preaching, Building and Burying: Friars and the Medieval City. London: Yale University Press, 2014.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Visualizing Venice: An International Collaboration.” In Lo spazio narrabile. Scritti di storia inonore di Donatella Calabi, edited by Rosa Tamborrino and Guido Zucconi, 155-160. Venice: Quodlibet, 2014.

Articles

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Teaching with Visualization Technologies: How Does Information Become Knowledge.” Material Religion 9 (2013): 246-253.

Databases

Medieval Kingdom of Sicily: A Database of Monuments and Sites. Project Director: Caroline Bruzelius; Project Managers: Paola Vitolo and Joseph C. Williams; Project Collaborators: Gabriella Cianciolo, Francesco Gangemi, Luciana Mocciola, Ruggero Longo, Alba Irollo; Metadata and Image Management Consultant: John J. Taormina; Technical Consultant and Database/Web Developer: David Tremmel.

Presentations

Baltes, Elizabeth P., Caroline Bruzelius, Hannah L. Jacobs, and Timothy Shea. “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum.” Intermezzo Speaking Series, Art, Art History & Visual Studies. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 29, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Revolutionizing Teaching with Technology,” Clark University, Worcester, MA. April 2010.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “What Can Digital Technologies Do for the Humanities?” Annual meeting of Art Libraries Society/Southeast. Duke University, Durham, NC. 2011.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Teconologia e l’insegnamento,” Ca’Foscari University, Venice, Italy. October 2011.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “What Does Technology have to do with the Humanities?” Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. 2011.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “What Does Technology have to do with the Humanities?” St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO. 2012.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “TEDx Talk” on Technology and Teaching. 2012

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Teaching with Technology,” University of Vermont, Burlington, VT. January 2012.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Visualizing Venice,” Digital Art History Symposium. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. November 2014.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Tecnologia visuale e la Storia dell’Arte,” La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. April 2014.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Digital Urban History: la storia della città tra ricerca e musei.” University of Turin, Turin, Italy. February 2-4, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Apps, Maps, and Models –The Digital Revolution and History,” Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. March 27, 2017.

Bruzelius, Caroline. “Transforming Art History in the Digital Revolution.” Digital Art History Research Group. The Courtault Institute of Art, London, UK. June 12, 2017.

Bruzelius, Caroline and Rachael Brady “Digital Technology and the Humanities.” Mount Holyoke College and University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA. 2012.

Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Wired! Full Immersion: Neatline and the Digital Syllabus.” Media Arts + Sciences Rendezvous. Duke University, Durham, NC. March 19, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Demonstration: Using a Neatline Syllabus in the Introductory Art History Survey. Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology: “A Signature Pedagogy for Art History in the Twenty-First Century.” College Art Association Annual Conference, Washington, D.C. February 3, 2016.

Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J.V. Olson, Donatella Calabi, Andrea Giordano, Victoria E. Szabo. “Visualizing Venice.” Florentia Illustrata. Digital Mapping and Techniques of Visualizing the Pre-modern Italian City. Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. Florence, Italy. June 17, 2013.

Bruzelius, Caroline and Victoria E. Szabo. “The Lives of Places and Cities: New models of representation and their conceptual implications for the past and present.” Seminario Internazionale: Promosso dagli insegnamenti: Storia dell’architettura e Disegno edile. Università degli Studi di Padova. Padua, Italy. June 9, 11, and 16, 2014.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Caroline Bruzelius. “Learning by Making: Digital Methods and the Wired! Experiment at Duke University.” Invited Public Lecture. Inaugural Lecture, Wesleyan Digital and Computational Knowledge Initiative, Wesleyan University. March 6, 2013.

 

News & Events

Visualizing Venice: The City and the Lagoon

Sheila Dillon

Professor of Art History and Classical Studies
| CV || website || contact |

Sheila Dillon received a Ph.D. in Classical Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She teaches courses on Greek and Graeco-Roman art and archaeology. Her research interests focus on portraiture and public sculpture and on reconstructing the statuary landscape of ancient cities and sanctuaries. Her books include The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010); Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, and Styles (2006), which was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2008; Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (2006); and an edited volume A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012). Professor Dillon was a member of the Aphrodisias Excavations in Turkey from 1992-2004, has worked at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace, and now spends summers doing fieldwork in Athens. Her current projects include a history of portrait sculpture in Roman Athens, which examines the impact of Roman rule and Roman portrait styles on Athenian portraiture, and a digital mapping project of the archaeology of Athens, a collaborative endeavor centered in the Wired! Lab that involves undergraduate and graduate students at Duke and international colleagues in Athens. Professor Dillon was the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology from 2013-2016.


Courses

Wired!

Art & Archaeology of Ancient Athens  Spring 2014 | Spring 2017


Projects

Aphrodisias

Death, burial and commemoration in Athens from antiquity to the late 19th century

Digital Athens

Delos

Statues Speak


Publications & Presentations

Books & Book Chapters

Dillon, Sheila, and Timothy Shea. “Statues as Artifacts: Towards an Archaeology of Greek Sculpture.” Greek Art In Context: Archaeological and Art Historical Perspective. Routledge, 2017. 19-29.

Articles

Dillon, Sheila, and Elizabeth Palmer Baltes. “Honorific Practices and the Politics of Space on Hellenistic Delos.” American Journal of Archaeology 117 (2013): 207-46.

Presentations

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Kristin Huffman

Lecturing Fellow
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Kristin L. Huffman is a Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University. Her current research focuses on the uses and configurations of space for the visual arts, the topic of her book project, Visual Rhetoric and Spatial Dynamics in Early Modern Venice. In it, she examines the intentional construction of visual systems with independent monuments, their alignment with urban spatial phenomena, and the deliberate ordering and presentation of knowledge and ideologies.

Her interest in lost urban experiences and reconstructing transformed or demolished spaces led her to work with Wired! at Duke as well asVisualizing Venice. For the latter, she contributed to the exhibition, Water and Food in Venice, at the Ducal Palace in 2015, and most recently curated the exhibition, A Portrait of Venice: Jacopo de’ Barbari’s View of 1500 presently on display at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke. She has recently organized a symposium, Stories about Venice and de’ Barbari’s Marvelous View of 1500, as part of a publication that will present scholarly essays together with the digital stories featured within the exhibition.


Courses

Art in Renaissance Italy

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

Splendor of the City: Art and Architecture of Renaissance Venice

Splendor of Renaissance Venice

Visualizing Venetian Art


Projects

A Portrait of Venice

Mapping Stereotomy

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA)

Venice Virtual World

Visualizing Venice

Water and Food in Venice. Stories of the Lagoon and the City


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman, Olson, Mark J.V., and Szabo, Victoria E. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin. Forthcoming 2015.

Presentations

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman. “Visualizing Venice: Digital Tools & Urban History,” Berlin, March 2015.

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman and Victoria Szabo. Temple University Libraries Symposium on Digital Cultures. Philadelphia, PA. October 21, 2014.

 

News & Events

A Symposium on de’ Barbari’s Marvelous View of Venice

A Portrait of Venice Opens at the Nasher Museum of Art

Hannah Jacobs

Digital Humanities Specialist
| CV || contact |

Hannah provides instruction and conducts research in digital concepts and tools for Wired! courses and projects. She leads tutorials and workshops, collaborates with faculty to develop and implement digital humanities projects in the classroom, consults on faculty research, offers advising on digital tools for undergraduate and Master’s student theses, provides technical support for lab projects, and liaises with other digital humanities staff at Duke.

Hannah holds an MA in Digital Humanities from King’s College London (2013) and a BA in English/Theatre from Warren Wilson College (2011). She volunteers as the Communications Officer for the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. She is interested in potentials of visual interactive storytelling for scholarly communications, public outreach, and education. In her spare time, she is a potter and photographer.

Image Credit: Kaley Deal

 


Courses

Art in Renaissance Italy

Gothic Cathedrals

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar I

Introduction to Art History

Italian Baroque Art

The Lives of Things

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

The Medieval Castle in Britain

Visualizing Venetian Art


Projects

Dictionary of Art Historians

Kingdom of Sicily Image Database

A Portrait of Venice

Statues Speak

Venice Interactive Visual Atlas

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Collaborative Teaching & Digital Visualization in an Art History Classroom.” Visual Resources Association Bulletin, forthcoming.

Presentations

Baltes, Elizabeth P., Caroline Bruzelius, Hannah L. Jacobs, and Timothy Shea. “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum.” Intermezzo Speaking Series, Art, Art History & Visual Studies. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 29, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Wired! Full Immersion: Neatline and the Digital Syllabus.” Media Arts + Sciences Rendezvous. Duke University, Durham, NC. March 19, 2015.

Bruzelius, Caroline, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “Demonstration: Using a Neatline Syllabus in the Introductory Art History Survey. Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology: “A Signature Pedagogy for Art History in the Twenty-First Century.” College Art Association Annual Conference, Washington, D.C. February 3, 2016.

Holloway, Carson, and Hannah L. Jacobs. “DEVONthink.” DH Studio Workshop, Digital Scholarship Services. Duke University, Durham, NC. March 25, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Visualizing the New Woman.” Media Arts + Sciences Rendezvous. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 25, 2014.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Visualizing the New Woman.” DH Sandbox Chats, Digital Scholarship Services. Duke University, Durham, NC. February 4, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Teaching & Learning with Virtual Reality: Learn About It & Experience It.” Learn IT @ Lunch Speaking Series. Duke University, Durham, NC. September 9, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Reflections on Uses of Spatiotemporal Visualization in a Humanities Classroom.” Visualization & Interactive Systems Friday Forum Speaking Series. Duke University, Durham, NC. October 16, 2015.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Digital Curation in the Arts: Working with the Wired! Lab.” Duke Library Advisory Board. Duke University, Durham, NC. April 8, 2016.

Jacobs, Hannah L. “Collaborative Teaching & Critical Digital Making in an Art History Classroom.” Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 15, 2016.

Jacobs, Hannah L., and Victoria Szabo. “Digital Archiving & Storytelling in the Classroom with Omeka & CurateScape.Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 12, 2016.

 

Paul Jaskot

Director, Wired! Lab | Professor of Art History
| contact |

Paul Jaskot was previously Professor of the History of Art and Architecture and Director of Studio χ at DePaul University. He specializes in the history of modern German architecture and art, with a particular interest in the political history of architecture before, during, and after the Nazi era. He has also published on Holocaust Studies topics more broadly, modern architecture including the history of Chicago architecture, methodological essays on Marxist art history, and diverse topics in Digital Art History. He has authored or edited several monographs and anthologies, including The Nazi Perpetrator: Postwar German Art and the Politics of the Right (University of Minnesota Press, 2012).

Paul has also been deeply involved in Digital Art History issues for the past decade, both as a scholar and as an advocate. In this role, he has been part of the Holocaust Geography Collaborative, an international team of scholars that has been exploring the use of GIS and other digital methods to analyze central problems in the history of the Holocaust, including issues rising from the built environment. He has worked most closely with Anne Kelly Knowles (University of Maine), co-authoring several presentations and essays with her, most recently as part of the anthology Geographies of the Holocaust (University of Indiana Press, 2014), the first volume on the use of GIS for the study of the Holocaust. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other sources.

From 2008-2010, he was the President of the College Art Association (CAA). With CAA, he has also participated in various task forces promoting the support of and guidelines for Digital Art History and its professional evaluation. Paul and Anne also co-directed the Samuel  H. Kress Foundation Summer Institute on Digital Mapping and Art History.  He continues to be active with CAA and with the promotion of Digital Art History initiatives nationally.

Photo Credit: DePaul University/Jeff Carrion


Projects

Digital Public Buildings in North Carolina

Mapping German Construction: From World War I through the Holocaust

Mark J.V. Olson

Cordelia and William Laverack Family Assistant Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
| website || contact |

Mark Olson is Cordelia and William Laverack Family Assistant Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies. His research explores how emerging technologies transform a wide array of communities of practice, from the use of new visualization technologies in art history and archaeology to the adoption of robotics in contemporary medicine. He contributes to the Wired Lab expertise and research on emergent 3D modeling and geo-spatial mapping techniques, with a particular focus on translating the affordances of these media practices into the concrete problematics of humanistic inquiry. Drawing on visual cultural studies’ work that maps the dynamic politics of modernity’s scopic regimes, Olson endeavors to foster critical reflection on the epistemologies embedded in and promoted by the Lab’s visualization initiatives.


Courses

Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

New Media, Memory, and the Visual Archive

The Museum Inside Out

Topics in Visual Studies: 3D Design Programming


Projects

Alife Arch App

The Lives of Things

Operating Archives: An Interactive Archive of Historical Medical Technologies

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Lanzoni, Kristin, Olson, Mark J.V., and Szabo, Victoria E. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin. Forthcoming 2015.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Hacking the Humanities: 21st Century Literacies and the ‘Becoming-Other’ of the Humanities” in E. Belfiore and A. Upchurch (Eds.). Humanities in the Twenty-First Century : Beyond Utility and Markets. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. pp. 237-250.
doi: 10.1057/9781137361356.0021

Presentations

Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J.V. Olson, Donatella Calabi, Andrea Giordano, Victoria E. Szabo. “Visualizing Venice.” Florentia Illustrata. Digital Mapping and Techniques of Visualizing the Pre-modern Italian City. Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. Florence, Italy. June 17, 2013.

Dillon, Sheila, Mark J.V. Olson, and Raquel Salvatella de Prada. “Wired! New Representation Technologies for Historical Materials.” Invited Presentation. C.H.A.T.: A Digital Arts and Humanities Festival, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. February 17, 2010.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Toward a Process Ontology for Digital Archives.” Invited Keynote. North Carolina Preservation Consortium Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC. November 2, 2012.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Digital Technologies and the Social Life of Things: The Wired Lab at Duke University.” Panel Presentation, Connections and Transformations: New Technologies in the Arts and Humanities. Annual Meeting of the Southeastern College Art Conference. Greensboro, NC. November 1, 2013.

Olson, Mark J.V. “Storytelling with Sources: Open Source Digital Humanities.” Invited Lecture. Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY. June 3, 2014.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Elizabeth P. Baltes, Erica Sherman, Victoria Szabo. “Digital Scholarly Communication – Notes from the Wired! Lab for Digital Historical Visualization,” HASTAC 2011 Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, December 02, 2011.

Olson, Mark J.V. and Caroline Bruzelius. “Learning by Making: Digital Methods and the Wired! Experiment at Duke University.” Invited Public Lecture. Inaugural Lecture, Wesleyan Digital and Computational Knowledge Initiative, Wesleyan University. March 6, 2013.

News & Events

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice

Visualizing Venice Wired! Workshop

Victoria Szabo

Associate Research Professor, Visual and Media Studies & Program Director, Information Science + Information Studies
| CV || website || contact |

Victoria Szabo is Assistant Research Professor of Visual Studies and New Media in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies. She is also the Program Director for Information Science + Information Studies, and the co-Director of the Franklin Humanities Institute’s GreaterThanGames Lab. Her interests are in in digital media and cultures, in theory and in practice. Her current projects focus on “metaverse” technologies such as interactive maps, virtual worlds, and hybrid reality systems, and how they can be applied to humanities teaching and research. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Rochester and worked as a professional academic technology developer before coming to Duke in 2006.


Courses

Digital Cities

Digital Cities: Representing the Past and Inventing the Future

Historical and Cultural Visualization Proseminar 1


Projects

Augmenting Urban Experiences

Digital Durham

Duke/Durham Ghosts

Ghett/App

Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany Collaboration

Visualizing Venice


Publications & Presentations

Articles

Bruzelius, Caroline, Mark J.V. Olson, Donatella Calabi, Andrea Giordano, Victoria E. Szabo. “Visualizing Venice.” Florentia Illustrata. Digital Mapping and Techniques of Visualizing the Pre-modern Italian City. Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. Florence, Italy. June 17, 2013.

Bruzelius, Caroline and Victoria E. Szabo. “The Lives of Places and Cities: New models of representation and their conceptual implications for the past and present.” Seminario Internazionale: Promosso dagli insegnamenti: Storia dell’architettura e Disegno edile. Università degli Studi di Padova. Padua, Italy. June 9, 11, and 16, 2014.

Lanzoni, Kristin, Olson, Mark J.V., and Szabo, Victoria E. “Wired! and Visualizing Venice: Scaling up Digital Art History.” Artl@s Bulletin. Forthcoming 2015.

Szabo, Victoria E., “Transforming Art History Research with Database Analytics: Visualizing Art Markets.” Art Documentation 31: 2 (2012): 158-175.

Presentations

Jacobs, Hannah L., and Victoria Szabo. “Digital Archiving & Storytelling in the Classroom with Omeka & CurateScape.Digital Humanities 2016. Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. July 12, 2016.

Lanzoni, Kristin Huffman and Victoria Szabo. Temple University Libraries Symposium on Digital Cultures. Philadelphia, PA. October 21, 2014.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Visual Studies and Digital Humanities”, Invited Speaker, 20th Anniversary of Visual and Cultural Studies Series. University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, March 30, 2010 – April 1, 2010.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Building the Digital City: New Media Theory Meets Digital Humanities Practice.” HASTAC 2013 Conference. Toronto, Ontario. April 27, 2013.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Visualizing the Past: Database-Driven Exploration in Hybrid Reality Systems.” Digital Humanities Symposium – Florentia Illustrata. Center for Disciplinary Innovation, University of Chicago, Chicago IL. January 13-14, 2014.

Szabo, Victoria E. “On Site and On Location: Digital Heritage and the 21st Century Museum.” Centre de Recerca i Debat. Museo D’Historia de Barcelona. Barcelona, Spain. June 26, 2014.

Szabo, Victoria E. “Augmented Humanities Practice: The Fluid Site of Annotation.” Society for Literature, Science and the Arts (SLSA). Dallas, TX. October 11, 2014.

News & Events

Digital Heritage International Congress 2013

Visualizing Venice: The City and the Lagoon

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice

Visualizing Venice Wired! Workshop