For public workshops, such as Visualizing Venice, listed on the Workshops page.

Duke Receives NEH Grant for Virtual & Augmented Reality Summer Institute

October 11, 2017

Wired! is thrilled to be a co-sponsor of the Summer 2018/19 Institute for Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities, HT-256969 Virtual and Augmented Reality for the Digital Humanities Institute (V/AR-DHI).

V/AR-DHI consists of a two-week summer institute for up to 12 participants to take place in Summer 2018 and to be focused on the application of VR and AR to humanities research, teaching and outreach. The program is co-sponsored by the Digital Humanities Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, the Wired! Lab for Digital Art History & Visual Culture, the Information Science + Studies Program, the History Department, and the Duke Immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) in the Pratt School of Engineering. The focus is on developing virtual and augmented reality capacity among humanities researchers through a combination of critical and scientific readings and discussion, hands-on development workshops, informed critiques of existing projects, and group project implementation and reflection. It is also to intervene in the VR/AR scientific conversation from a humanistic perspective.  Throughout the workshop, participants will discuss best practices, optimal workflows, and strategies for collaboration. After the workshop the participants will communicate via a shared blog and social networking site. Workshop materials will be published online in the form of streaming videos, handouts, and exercises. In Year Two the instructional team will reconvene to finalize the formal white paper as well refine the online resources based on user feedback, participant contributions, and collective development of the field in the intervening period.

The program is designed for humanists who already demonstrate basic digital and/or computational skills in areas such as database design, image and time-based media editing, creative coding, HGIS, 3D modeling, data visualization and other areas, and who wish to expand their repertoire of available methods to include VR and AR.  The goals of the workshop are: 1) to provide opportunities for interactive digital annotation of real and virtual artifacts; 2) re-imagine archival interfaces by engaging space and time; 3) to imaginatively reconstruct and present past or hypothetical built structures within interactive environments; and 4) to articulate best practice, challenges, and opportunities these emergent forms offer to humanities scholarship. Because V/AR-DHI is the first Institute devoted to the analysis and discussion of the intellectual value of VR & AR to be conducted by digital humanities scholars, it promises making a significant impact in a variety of fields.

PI: VIctoria Szabo, Art, Art History & Visual Studies and Information Science + Studies
Co-PI: Philip Stern, History

First Meeting: July 23-August 3, 2018
Second Meeting: July 2019 (specific dates TBA)

Details, CFP, and V/AR-DHI Summer Institute schedule forthcoming. For updates on the program as it develops, Subscribe to our Mailing List.

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

June 8, 2016 — June 20, 2016
Venice International University, Venice, Italy
Instructors: Caroline Bruzelius, Mark Olson, Victoria Szabo (Duke University) TAs: Ludovica Galeazzo (University of Venice); Hannah Jacobs, Ed Triplett (Duke University)

Application deadline: March 31, 2016.

What is it about?

Digital Technologies for Historical and Cultural visualization are transforming the ways that scholars
can study and represent works of art, as well as growth and change in urban spaces and buildings. With the support of The Getty Foundation as part of its Digital Art History initiative, The Wired! Lab at Duke University, Università Iuav di Venezia, the University of Padua, and Venice International University are collaborating on a Summer Workshop that will train Art, Architectural and Urban Historians with the digital media that can enhance or transform their research questions and their capacity to communicate narratives about objects, places and spaces to the public.
Instruction will be in English.

The course will engage with the Ghetto of Venice on the 500th anniversary of its creation as case
study for training with a variety of technologies and applications. (On June 19th there will be the opening of an exhibition dedicated to the history of the Ghetto curated by Prof. Donatella Calabi).

 

Course description

The summer course will teach a range of digital skills in mapping, 3D modeling, mobile application
development, and time based media authorship to enable participants to engage historical questions with emerging digital tools. The technologies are taught through the use of a theme, which for the summer of 2016 is “The Ghetto of Venice”.
During the first week of the course participants will learn techniques for digital production by drawing
upon existing research materials. Each day, participants will learn about a different type of digital media production within the context of how that type of reconstruction is typically used in digital art and architectural history.
During the second week, the participants will work collaboratively to create projects using the tools they have learned, with the goal of creating high-quality, public-facing research products suitable for a general audience, as well as identifying potential areas to explore in their own future research.

 

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes include: familiarity and facility with digital media production tools for digital art
and architectural history; awareness of the critical and practical challenges to the fields that digital
production techniques pose; understanding of the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of digital
media authorship as an intervention into digital heritage and lived experience of the city.

 

Who can apply?

The workshop is designed for Ph.D or Post doctoral participants in the Interpretive Humanities (including Cultural Patrimony, History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism, History, Geography, Architecture, Archaeology, and other relevant disciplines).

Preference will be given to Ph.D. students and recent Ph.D. graduates in History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism.
Instruction will be in English, of which participants must have an adequate working knowledge.
Maximum number of participants: 16

 

Application form available here.

Program structure

The course duration is 12 days. Participants should expect to be engaged full time in during the twelve
days. Participants should plan to arrive June 7 and depart June 21.
Credits

An official Duke University/Università Iuav/Venice International University joint Certificate will be issued at the end of the course.
Number of ECTS credits allocated: 3

Duration and Period

12 days, June 8 – 20, 2016

Location

Venice International University on the island of San Servolo in the Venetian Lagoon is an ideal setting
for onsite study. Participants can live in the housing facilities of the island of San Servolo, or arrange for accommodation in the city of Venice.

 

Tuition and Scholarships

Tuition fees are euro 1,000 (+22%VAT).
Scholarships are available in order to support tuition, travel, board and accommodation expenses.
Thanks to the generosity of the Getty Foundation.
 
Contacts and info:

Venice International University
Isola di San Servolo
30133 Venice
ITALY
T +39 041 2719511
F +39 041 2719510
E shss@univiu.org , summerschools@univiu.org

http://www.univiu.org/shss/seminars-summer-schools/visualizing-venice-summer-workshop

 

View the 2015 workshop’s public archive. Download the PDF brochure.

 

Visualizing Venice summer workshop is organized by Venice International University and jointly promoted by:

 

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With the support of:

Visualizing Venice: The Biennale and the City

June 1, 2015 — June 12, 2015
Instructors: Caroline Bruzelius, Mark Olson, Victoria Szabo (Duke University); Donatella Calabi (University of Venice) TAs: Ludovica Galeazzo, Chiara Di Stefano (University of Venice); Hannah Jacobs (Duke University)

View the 2015 workshop’s public archive.

 

What is it about?

The field of historical and cultural visualization has grown substantially in recent years. For the past three years, Duke University, Università IUAV di Venezia, and Venice International University have collaborated on the Visualizing Venice Summer Workshops at VIU.
This year’s theme, “The Biennale and the City” reflects both the maturation of the international Visualizing Venice collaboration and the increasing accessibility of digital tools for representing change over time in urban environments. This collaboration enables us to bring together art and architectural history scholars with digital media specialists and engineers in order to create new opportunities to research and share information about the built past.
VIU is the ideal place to bring together an international set of graduate students studying digital art and art history by doing it onsite. Our unique capacity to offer courses that allow for both on site research and digital media production within a compressed time and intimate setting is unparalleled.

 

Course description

This course will teach a range of digital skills in digital mapping, 3D modeling from ground plans and photos, mobile application development, and time based media authorship to enable participants to engage historical questions with emerging digital tools.  As in the previous editions of the workshop, the technologies will be taught through the use of a theme.  The summer 2015 theme, “The Biennale and the City” allows for exploration of the history of the Venice Biennale from several perspectives and scales of reference: as a case study in architectural history in the Giardini and the Arsenale; as a set of exhibitions undertaken both on those sites and in more ephemeral sites around the city; as an aggregation of artistic forces hailing from around the world; and as a phenomenon with a profound impact upon the life and culture of the city of Venice itself.

 

The plan of the course will follow the pattern of previous years.
During the first week of the course students will learn techniques for digital production by drawing
upon existing research materials provided by colleagues in the Visualizing Venice team. Each day, students will learn about a different type of digital media production within the context of how that type of reconstruction is typically used in digital art and architectural history.
During the second week, the students will work collaboratively to create projects using the tools they have learned, with the goal of creating high-quality, public-facing research products suitable for a general audience, as well as identifying potential areas to explore in their own future research.

 

Schedule

Students will see examples and will participate in tutorial sessions around the following topics:

Day 1
Introductions and Course Overview
Historical Overview of the Biennale
Computer Orientation
Day 2
Topics in Digital Mapping – Lecture and Examples
Digital Mapping with Google Earth and Web-Based Systems
Historical GIS: Techniques for Vector Data Analysis and Geo-rectification
Data Analysis and Visualization with Tableau
Day 3
Overview of Digital Project Archive Development
Archive-Development with Omeka; Representing Change Over Time with Neatline
Biennale Library visit
Day 4
3D Modeling with Google Sketchup
Photogrammetry Techniques for Object Capture
Day 5
Augmented Reality Application Design with Metaio Creator and Map2App
VirtualWorld Construction with OpenSim
Week-end
Visit Biennale at Giardini and Arsenale
Day 6
Digital Video Production
Project Team Planning
Day 7
Collaborative project work
Day 8
Collaborative project work
Day 9
Collaborative project work
Day 10
Final project work
Presentations to the public

 

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes include: familiarity and facility with digital media production tools for digital art and architectural history; awareness of the critical and practical challenges to the fields that digital production techniques pose; understanding of the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of digital media authorship as an intervention into digital heritage and lived experience of the city.

 

Who can apply?

The workshop is designed for participants at the Ph.D – or Post doctoral – level in Interpretive Humanities (including Cultural Patrimony, History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism, History, Geography, Architecture, Archaeology, and other relevant disciplines).

Instruction will be in English of which participants must have an adequate working knowledge.

Maximum number of students: 16

 

Program structure

The course duration is 10 days. Students will attend classes in the Digital Lab 5 days per week and will participate in one field trip (during the week-end) at the Venice Biennale premises.
Participants should expect to be engaged full time in these ten days.

 

Credits

An official Duke University/Università IUAV/Venice International University joint Certificate will be issued at the end of the course.
Number of ECTS credits allocated: 3

 

Scholarships
Accepted applicants will receive a stipend to help cover travel and lodging thanks to the generosity of the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Getty Foundation.

 

Duration and Period

10 days, June 1 – 12, 2015

 

Location

San Servolo Island, Venice, Italy

 

Contacts and info:

Venice International University

Isola di San Servolo

30100 Venice

ITALY

T +39 041 2719511

F +39 041 2719510

E shss@univiu.org

 

Applications due April 24, 2015

More information and to apply: http://www.univiu.org/shss/seminars-summer-schools/visualizing-venice-summer-workshop

Download the brochure.

 

Visualizing Venice summer workshop is jointly promoted by:

Duke University

Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Duke University

Wired! Lab, Duke University

Università IUAV di Venezia

Venice International University

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Getty Foundation provide vital support.

project-GettyFoundationLogo-blue-highres

 

 

 

project-DelmasFoundationLogo

Summer Workshop Series: Introduction to Unity

May 12, 2015 — August 11, 2015
Wired! Lab (Smith Warehouse, Bay 11, 2nd Floor, A233)

12:00-2:00pm

This summer, the Wired! Lab will be hosting an informal workshop series for anyone in the Duke community interested in learning the Unity gaming engine.

Come learn Unity with a group of likeminded Unity beginners on selected Tuesdays throughout the summer. (Check the sign up form below for specific dates.) We’ll start from the very beginning by working through Lynda.com tutorials together. Then we’ll move to a needs-based approach where we’ll select tutorials specific to our interests and help each other troubleshoot our projects. Bring your lunch to munch while we learn!

Sign up: http://bit.ly/wired-unity

Contact hannah.jacobs[at]duke.edu for more information.

 

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Visualizing Venice: The City and the Lagoon Projects

Visualizing Venice: The City and the Lagoon

June 3, 2014 — June 13, 2014
Venice International University, Venice Italy
Caterina Balletti, Università Iuav di Venezia; Isabella di Lenardo, Università Iuav di Venezia; Victoria Szabo, Duke University

UPDATES:

View the 2014 workshop projects.

10-24-2014 – Read one student’s reflections on her experience.

 

What is it about?
This course will teach a range of digital skills in 3D modeling, visualization, and mapping technologies to enable participants to engage historical questions with emerging digital tools. As in the previous editions of the workshop, the technologies will be taught through the use of a theme: in 2014 the focus will be on Venice and its islands. Participants will use the city and the lagoon as a “laboratory” through which to examine questions such as change over time and dynamic process in urban and rural environments, showing how man-made spaces respond to social and economic process and transformation.
The aim of the workshop is to train scholars in how new technologies can be integrated with the study of historical and material culture. The workshop will focus on a range of visualization tools that can be used in a wide variety of research areas, in particular modeling change over time in urban space and the production of maps and low-cost photogrammetry.

Learning outcomes
Students will learn historical visualization and representation technologies through collaborative authorship of final multimedia projects completed over the course of the 10-day workshop session:
– Overview of historical contents (front lessons – site visits)
– Image processing (hands on session)
– Photogrammetry; Laser Scanning (hands on session)
– Georeferencing of historical maps (hands on session)
– Data Visualization and Presentation (hands on session)
– 3D Modelling (hands on session)
– Augmented Reality (hands on session)

You will develop basic skills in: Photoshop, Photoscan, Pointools, ArcGIS, Audio editing with Audacity, Video editing with iMovie, Data Visualization with Fusion Tables, Interactive Virtual Worlds with OpenSim, Augmented Reality with BuildAR, Mobile Apps with Map2App.

Who can apply?
The workshop is designed for participants at the Master’s, Ph.D- of Post doctoral level in Interpretive Humanities (including Cultural Patrimony, History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism, History, Geography, Architecture, Archaeology, and other relevant disciplines).
Instruction will be in English of which participants must have an adequate working knowledge.
Maximum number of students: 16

Program structure
The course duration is 10 days. Students will attend classes in the Digital Lab 5 days per week and will participate in one field trip (on Saturday) in the Venice Lagoon. Participants should expect to be engaged full time in these ten days.

Credits
An official Duke University/Iuav University/Venice International University joint Certificate will be issued at the end of the course.

Tuition fees
Tuition fees are 1,000 euro+VAT.
Successful candidates will receive information about modes of payment once admitted to the program. Scholarships may become available in the late Spring in order to support tuition, travel, board and accommodation expenses.

Duration and Period
10 days, June 3 – 13, 2014

Location
San Servolo island, Venice, Italy

Contacts and info:
Venice International University
Isola di San Servolo
30100 Venice
ITALY
T +39 041 2719511
F +39 041 2719510
E shss@univiu.org

For more information: http://www.univiu.org/shss/seminars-summer-schools/visualizing-venice-summer-workshop

Visualizing Venice: The Ghetto of Venice

June 4, 2013 — June 14, 2013
Venice International University, Venice, Italy
Donatella Calabi, Università Iuav di Venezia; Mark Olson, Duke University; Victoria Szabo, Duke University

The aim of the workshop, jointly promoted by Duke University, Iuav University of Venice and Venice International University is to provide a thorough introduction to a series of digital tools for the analysis, interpretation and visualization of data related to the shaping of man-made space. The following technologies will be taught and used by students: 3D modeling using Google SketchUp, 3D acquisition using Photogrammetry, interactive mapping with Google Earth, Scalar, and the basics of ARCgis related to Google Earth. These 3D modeling, visualization, and mapping technologies enable the students to engage with questions of change over time and dynamic process in urban and rural environments, showing how man-made spaces respond to social and economic process and transformation. The workshop is addressed to Master’s- or Ph.D- level students in Interpretive Humanities (including Cultural Patrimony, History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism, History, Geography, Architecture, Archaeology, and other relevant disciplines).

TimeMap and Video Archive

Workshop Website

Visualizing Venice: The Waters of Venice

June 4, 2012 — June 16, 2012
Venice International University, Venice, Italy

Giorgio Gianighian, Università Iuav di Venezia; Mark Olson, Erica Sherman, and Victoria Szabo, Duke University

The first edition of this summer workshop jointly promoted by Duke University, Iuav University of Venice and Venice International University was held at VIU from June 4 to June 16, 2012. The academic activities were coordinated by Prof. Mark Olson and Prof. Victoria Szabo from Duke and Prof. Girogio Gianighian from Iuav.

The aim of the workshop was to provide a thorough introduction to a series of digital tools for the analysis, interpretation and visualization of data related to the shaping of man-made space.

The following technologies were taught and used by students: 3D modeling using Google SketchUp, 3D acquisition using Photogrammetry, interactive mapping with Google Earth, Scalar, and the basics of ARCgis related to Google Earth. These 3D modeling, visualization, and mapping technologies enabled the students to engage with questions of change over time and dynamic process in urban and rural environments, showing how man-made spaces respond to social and economic process and transformation.

The program of the 2012 workshop focused on the example of data for the drinking water supply system of Venice, using this documentation to visualize how supply systems determine the shaping of urban space. The city of Venice thus became a laboratory for training with technology.

The workshop was addressed to Master’s- or Ph.D- level students in Interpretive Humanities (including Cultural Patrimony, History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism, History, Geography, Architecture, Archaeology, and other relevant disciplines). Fifteen students from all over the world were selected to participate in the workshop.

In ten days of intense work in the VIU Mac laboratory and site visits in the city, students obtained skills that permitted them to interpret, visualize, and communicate collaborative research projects. The four final projects were presented to a public of specialists and interested guests at the end of the workshop.

Video Archive

Workshop Website

Visualizing Venice Wired! Workshop

June 7, 2010 — June 18, 2010
Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
Rachael Brady, Duke University; Mark Olson, Duke University; Victoria Szabo, Duke University

This first workshop, offered by the Wired! Lab with support from Duke University’s Department of Art, Art Hiostry & Visual Studies and the Visual Studies Initiative, focused on digital visualization technology for Archaeology, Architecture, Art History, and Urbanism. The workshop was open to faculty, staff, and graduate students.

Schedule:

Monday, June 7
Welcome & Overview, Introduction and Goals
Introduction to 3D Modeling: Google SketchUp

Tuesday, June 8
Data-driven Web Applications

Wednesday, June 9
Contextual Mapping and Geo-Spatial Representation
GPS-tagged images and KML in Google Maps and Google Earth

Thursday, June 10
Geo-Spatial Historical Visualization

Friday, June 11
Object Capture: Digital Photography for 2D & 3D Visualization

Monday, June 14
2D Image Reconstruction using Photoshop
3D Photogrammetric Techniques

Tuesday, June 15
Image Processing: Visual Search and Techniques for Aggregating Visual Information

Wednesday, June 16
Advanced Google SketchUp Techniques: 3D Animation, Lighting and Scripting

Thursday, June 17
Laser Scanning of Objects and Architecture
Measurement and High-Res Models

Friday, June 18
Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds
Closing Reception and Exhibition of Participant Work