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Play the Venice Virtual World!

April 18, 2016
Wired! Lab (Smith | Bay 11 2nd Floor | Rm 266)

Imagine life in eighteenth-century Venice: a mission, intrigue, and an assassination attempt…

Members of the Duke community are invited to participate in user testing of the Venice Virtual World!

Contact XL93[at]duke[dot]edu to play.

This project, part of the Visualizing Venice collaborative research initiative, has recreated the life of Venice—its buildings, bridges, boats, gardens, and inhabitants—in a 3-D virtual environment. The focus is on the now completely transformed zone of the city around the train station. Using old maps, plans, and costume books, students have reconstructed Venice as it appeared in 1740. The outcome is a navigable virtual world with digital storytelling.

Visualizing Venice Workshop receives funding from The Getty

March 17, 2016
Venice, Italy

The Visualizing Venice workshop, an annual digital art history training opportunity for graduate students and early career scholars held at Venice International University, has been granted $140,000 by The Getty Foundation to support the 2016 summer institute. The Getty’s generous support enables the workshop to offer participants scholarship for tuition, travel, and accommodation.

The 2016 workshop will introduce a range of digital skills in mapping, 3D modeling, mobile application development, web technologies, and time based media authorship to enable participants to engage historical questions with emerging digital tools. The technologies are taught through the use of a theme, which for the summer of 2016 is “The Ghetto of Venice”. During the first week of the course participants will learn techniques for digital production by drawing upon existing research materials. Each day, participants will learn about a different type of digital media production within the context of how that type of reconstruction is typically used in digital art and architectural history. During the second week, the participants will work collaboratively to create projects using the tools they have learned, with the goal of creating high-quality, public-facing research products suitable for a general audience, as well as identifying potential areas to explore in their own future research.

Read more about the workshop or Apply Now!

Wired! at CAA 2016

February 3, 2016 — February 7, 2016
Washington, D.C.

**UPDATE 2/5/16: Check out the Wired! Lab Storify of #CAA2016.**

Find out when and where Wired! Lab faculty, staff, and students are presenting at the College Art Association:

Wednesday, February 3rd

A Signature Pedagogy for Art History in the Twenty-First Century

Time: 02/03/2016, 12:30 PM—2:00 PM
Location: Washington 1, Exhibition Level

Art Historians Interested in Pedagogy and Technology

Chairs: Nathalie N. Hager, University of British Columbia Okanagan; Sarah Jarmer Scott, Wagner College

Demonstration: Using a Neatline Syllabus in the Introductory Art History Survey
Caroline Bruzelius, Duke University; Hannah Jacobs, Duke University

Challenging the Canon: Using a Digital Platform for a Survey of World Architectures
Solmaz Mohammadzadeh Kive, University of Colorado Denver

The Implications of Augmented Reality in the Art History Curriculum: The Future of the Next Generation of Art Historians
R. Dean Turner, The Art Institute of Austin

 

Between the Ephemeral and the Virtual: Reactivating Art Installations through Digital Reconstructions

Time: 02/03/2016, 2:30 PM—5:00 PM

Location: Washington 5, Exhibition Level

Chairs: Laura Moure Cecchini, Duke University; Chiara Di Stefano, Independent Scholar

Blank Walls and Jarring Gaps: Reconstructing the Paris Salon du Louvre
Ryan L. Whyte, OCAD University

Virtual Histories: Reconstructing Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery
Heather A. McPherson, University of Alabama at Birmingham

‘Re-construct them with the materials of your epoch’: 3D Printing Futurist Sculpture
Rosalind McKever, Metropolitan Museum of Art

“Demonstrationsraum”: Re-/Activating the Past and Present of El Lissitzky’s “Abstract Cabinet”
Yvonne Bialek, Braunschweig University of Art

Digitally Reactivating Museums for Expanded Disability Access
Michael Tymkiw, University of Essex

Discussant: Kristin Love Huffman, Duke University

 

Thursday, February 4th

Digital Cultural Heritage as Public Humanities Collaboration

Time: 02/04/2016, 2:30 PM—5:00 PM
Location: Washington 1, Exhibition Level

Chair: Victoria E. Szabo, Duke University

The Regium Lepidi Project 2200
Maurizio Forte, Duke University; Nevio Danelon, Duke University

Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Bombs. Restoring the Monumental Landscape of South Italy (The Kingdom of Sicily Image Database)
Caroline A. Bruzelius, Duke University

Experimenting with 3D Visualizations of the Lost 17th Century Labyrinth of Versailles
Copper Frances Giloth, University of Massachusetts

Mapping Ararat and Beyond: Augmented Reality Walking Tours for Imagined Jewish Homelands
Louis P. Kaplan, University of Toronto; Melissa Shiff, York University

MQUADRO: a Platform Model for Cultural Heritage
Stefania Zardini Lacedelli, Regole of Ampezzo, Cortina; Giacomo Pompanin, ADOMultimedia, Cortina

Playing the Scales: the Human Scale in Digital Data Visualization
Radu Leon, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Università Iuav di Venezia

Program in Interactive Cultural Technology (PICT): a Partnership between New Mexico Highlands University and the New Mexico State Department of Cultural Affairs
Kerry Loewen, New Mexico Highlands University

The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity
Diana Ndiaye, Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Smithsonian

Discussant: Mark J.V. Olson, Duke University

 

Friday, February 5th

Procedural Art: Game Platforms for Creative Expression

Time: 02/05/2016, 3:00 PM—5:00 PM
Location: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom West, Mezzanine Level

This panel will focus on the design, aesthetics, and affordances of game platforms for new media art, as well as in critical approaches to this emerging genre. Participants will share projects that demonstrate the creative use of game platforms in fine art contexts, and in highlighting the full range of possibilities this new medium offers.

Moderators: Victoria Szabo, Duke University; Joyce Rudinsky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Participants:

Hye Young Kim, Winston-Salem State University
Soraya Murray, University of California, Santa Cruz
Paolo Pedercini, Carnegie Mellon University
Susana Ruiz, University of California, Santa Cruz
Myfanwy Ashmore, independent artist

[VIDEO] Digital Art History Symposium: Apps, Maps & Models

February 22, 2016
Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University

8:30am-6:30pm

event-20160222-DigitalArtHistorySymposium

UPDATE 2/23/16:

Missed the symposium? Watch the recordings and read the Twitter archive:

Morning session (9am-1pm EST) http://bit.ly/dah2016-morning 

Afternoon session: (2-5pm EST) http://bit.ly/dah2016-afternoon

Twitter archive: https://storify.com/dukewired/dah2016.

This one-day symposium will examine how digital tools prompt new approaches to teaching and research in art and architectural history, as well as in archaeology and visual studies. Databases, mapping, modeling, animations, and websites are also transforming the ways in which scholars and museums can communicate information to the public. Above all, digital tools stimulate entirely new types of research questions on the production and dissemination of works of art and material culture, the construction of buildings and cities, and issues of process and change over time.

The symposium provides an opportunity for the Wired! Group to reflect on its mission and to highlight the important digital work that is underway in many universities and museums across the country. We will hear about a variety of approaches to digital scholarship across a range of artistic periods and geographic areas in teaching, research, and museum displays from ancient through modern and in western and non-western art.

For more information and to register, visit http://sites.duke.edu/digsymposium/.

Read about the symposium’s press coverage: http://today.duke.edu/2016/02/digitalart.

Sponsored by the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies and the Wired! Lab.
With generous support from the Duke University Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Office of the Dean of Humanities, Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts, and the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

Duke’s Spring Digital Workshops

January 12, 2016

Whether you’re a student, staff or faculty member, there are many opportunities to brush up your digital skill set this spring at Duke. Topics range from Microsoft Office to command line to HTML to 3D printing to data visualization and everywhere in between. Here are some workshop series you’ll want to check out:

Tools for Digital Scholarship & Teaching in Art, Art History & Visual Studies

Data & Visualization Services

Events at The Edge

Innovation Co-Lab roots/ Series

Research Computing

OIT Training

Henrietta Miers: Mapping Venetian Ceiling Paintings

December 16, 2015
Henrietta Miers

The Wired! Lab’s Master’s program in Historical & Cultural Visualization was begun in August 2014. Three students recently completed the program.

 

Tell us a little about yourself.

I am from Bronxville, New York, a one square mile town where I attended Bronxville High School. In 2010, I attended Princeton University and graduated in 2014 with a BA in Art History. I wrote my senior thesis on the art of the British Nigerian Artist Yinka Shonibare. At Duke, I wrote my MA thesis on sixteenth-century ceiling paintings in Venetian churches at a time of religious reform. I created an extensive database of 17 ceiling cycles consisting of two collections, about 350 items, 3 interactive maps, and 3 exhibitions. After graduation, I hope to work in a museum position and eventually get my Ph.D. in Art History.

Why did you choose to attend the MA in Historical and Cultural Visualization program?

First, I explored the projects the Wired! lab was working on, especially Visualizing Venice, and thought it would be great to work on the project and eventually write my thesis on a Venetian topic. Second, the idea of learning about how to digitize art history made me want to be part of the program because art history is constantly changing, and it is exceptionally useful to know how to utilize digital tools and programs such as SketchUp and Omeka (to name a few).

What is the most valuable skill or concept you have learned in the MA program?

The most valuable concept I learned is how powerful and important visualization is to the future of art history. Art history is constantly evolving, and digitization of this discipline is the direction it is heading, which is already evident in certain museums.

How do you see this MA advancing your career goals?

This MA degree will advance my career goals because the program gave me a skill set that I did not have prior to entering Duke. The MA allowed me to learn to code scenes with BabylonJS, design a website using HTML, build a windmill in SketchUp, and construct a database of about 350 items using Omeka. These are only a few of the things I was able to accomplish during this program, and I believe these skills will be useful for a museum position.

Henrietta is a member of the MA program’s inaugural graduating class. Her thesis is titled “Mapping All Above: Sixteenth-Century Ceiling Painting at a Time of Religious Reform.” During her time at Duke she worked on the Venice Interactive Visual Atlas (VIVA). She also worked on a class project, “Troyes Cathedral: Stained Glass” in which students recolored black and white images of a stained glass window as a way of showing how the medieval window, whose colors are now dimmed with the passage of time, may have first appeared. 

UPDATE: Henrietta is now employed at an art gallery in New York.

Wired! Goes Down Under

November 2, 2015 — November 5, 2015
Australia
Caroline Bruzelius

Professor Caroline Bruzelius will be traveling to Australia this coming week to speak in Sydney and Canberra on Wired! Lab projects:

 

Digital Approaches in the Study of Early-Modern Visual Culture

November 2-4, 2015

Canberra, Australia

Presented by the Australian National University and The Power Institute Foundation at the University of Sydney

Professor Bruzelius will present “The Kingdom of Sicily Image Database: Creating a Scholarly Resource”.

 

Recasting the Question: Digital Approaches in Art History and Museums

November 5, 2015

Sydney, Australia

Presented by The Power Institute Foundation at the University of Sydney and the Research School of Humanities and the Arts, Australian National University, with support from the Asia Art Archive.

Professor Bruzelius will deliver the keynote address, “Digital Thinking and Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, and the Museum”.

 

Image Credit

The Lives Of Things Color Projection Exhibit Unveiled at the Nasher

UPDATES: Wired! Project featured on Oxford Archaeology

September 29, 2015
by Alta Zhang

UPDATED November 18, 2015: Project featured in North Carolina State University’s student newspaper, Technician. Read the article here.

A Wired! Lab student project is currently being featured on the Oxford Archaeology website in connection with excavations being undertaken at Westgate in Oxford, UK. The project contains various research and an animated film. This film, as a main output of this project, is featured in the Open Day for Oxford Archaeology Westgate Excavation, exhibiting the Buildings of Grey and Black friars in a visual and digital way. For more information, please visit the page of Westgate Excavation in Oxford.

Created by Jim Knowles (Grad ’09) and Michal Koszychi (Trinity ’09), “Great Houses Make Not Men Holy: Mendicant Architecture in Medieval Oxford” is an animated film about the medieval Franciscan and Dominican foundations in Oxford. By using a sixteenth-century map with later added 3D model and digital reconstructions, the project combines multifaceted scholarship to visualize the historical vicissitude between 1220s and 1530s. The project grew out of a collaboration between the two authors and Wired Digital Visualization Training Program at Duke University.

The animated film is available on the project’s website with an overview of the research work about the architectural and topographical features. In the film, a 3D reconstruction is presented, and a timeline is provided for better understandings the chronological development of Franciscan and Dominican churches. Various textual and illuminated sources from different time periods are combined, analyzed and visualized.

 

Digital Thinking & Art History: Re-Imagining Teaching, Research, & the Museum

September 29, 2015
Collision Space (Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, 2nd Floor, A266)

12:00-1:00PM
Elizabeth BaltesCaroline BruzeliusHannah JacobsTimothy SheaMariano Tepper

Intermezzo is an event series sponsored by the Art, Art History and Visual Studies department. The series enables graduate students and faculty to present ongoing projects to one another in an informal setting.

The September 29th Intermezzo will feature members of the Wired! Lab discussing their experiences using digital methods in teaching and research. Caroline Bruzelius and Hannah Jacobs will speak about the use of spatiotemporal visualization to create an interactive course syllabus. Elizabeth Baltes and Timothy Shea will discuss the affordances digital tools have lent to their research. Mariano Tepper will demonstrate components of The Lives of Things project’s newest digital exhibition at the Nasher, which digitally recolors medieval statues as they may have initially appeared at the time of their creation.