Building Duke: An Architectural History of Duke Campus from 1924 to Today

Spring 2020 | Spring 2019

ARTHIST 504SL | HCVIS 504SL

Kristin Huffman, Hannah Jacobs

Tu-Th 3:05-5:35pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Building Duke is a research seminar and laboratory on the architectural history of Duke Campus based on original archival materials (photos, blueprints, contracts, letters, and financial records) preserved in Duke Library collections. The course explores the variety of interpretative lenses in the field of architecture history, including (but not limited to) issues of style, patronage, labor, gender, and race. It analyzes notions of cultural identity as construed by Duke founders and administrators and as imprinted on Duke Campus by its architects and landscape designers. The students will produce original research projects based on primary materials and digital visualizations of changes in the physical fabric of Duke Campus through time.

Codes: Seminar, ALP, R

 

Image Credit: Duke University Archives


Collaborators

Brittany Forniotis

Kayla Marr

Daphne Turan

Jacqui Geerdes


Projects

Building Duke


News & Events

Building Duke Becomes Bass Connections Project Team

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2 on Models: History, Theory & Digital Practice

Spring 2019 | Spring 2016

HCVIS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01

Mark Olson, Annabel Wharton

TH 10:05AM-12:35PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Floor, A233)

Matt Ratto (2011) describes critical making as “a desire to theoretically and pragmatically connect two modes of engagement with the world that are often held separate—critical thinking, typically understood as conceptual and linguistically based, and physical ‘making,’ goal-based material work” (253). Models offer a site in which making and conceptualization are inextricably interwoven. Like models themselves, this seminar brings theory and practice together. We shall develop skills both in making models and in thinking about and through models.

Student projects will both model and analyze, theoretically and historically, a site or object of their choice. Digital 3d models will be constructed and then be presented in the form of a 20-minute conference paper and then refined and elaborated as a final paper.

Codes: Seminar, ALP, STS

Medieval Castles of Europe

Fall 2019, Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Fall 2016

ARTHIST 227 | MEDREN 227

Edward Triplett

TUTH 10:05am-11:20am | Smith, Bay 11, A233

This course will examine the transition of Western Europe into a fortified landscape from the mid-11th century until the advent of large-scale artillery in the mid-15th century. The castles of Spain and Portugal will be discussed in greatest detail, but these will be supplemented by influential examples from other parts of Europe and the Near East. In addition to tracking technological and stylistic changes over time, this course will identify the discrete elements of fortification that were combined into a variety of castle plans. As a way of investigating these topics, students will digitally reconstruct a historical or imagined castle in 3D graphics at a specific place and time covered in the course.

Codes: CZ, STS


Projects

Modeling Medieval European Castles

Visual Culture of Venice

Fall 2020 | Spring 2020 | Spring 2019 | Spring 2018

ARTHIST | VMS 89S

Kristin Huffman

W 11:45AM - 2:15PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Venice was one of the wealthiest and most powerful states in the Early Modern world (1450-1600). A city whose curved urban form seemingly floated on water, it was experienced, lived, and navigated unlike any in the world. This Wired! course entails an extensive analysis of the urban and natural topography of Venice in the Early Modern period, and it investigates the artistic commissions that made the city into one of the most admired and well-visited destinations in the world. The research component of the course will be a consideration of Venice as it appeared through the eyes of the early modern tourist, or foreign visitor to the city with visual itineraries that may be shared with a larger academic community. The course assumes no prior art historical or digital experience; students will be provided with the background necessary to understand the art and architectural history of early modern Venice, and the skills required for the digital technology.

Prereq: First year, First year with exception or Transfer students only

Class Attributes: Seminar, Topics Course