Introduction to Art History

Spring 2015

ARTHIST 101D-001 LEC & 101D-01D DIS

Caroline Bruzelius

Joseph Williams

MWF 10:05-10:55am | The Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

The Introduction to Art History covers the History of Art from Prehistory to the Middle Ages. A significant part of the course concerns mapping the transportation of raw materials (ivory, tin, copper, for example) as well as objects acquired through colonial expropriation (such as obelisks). We will concern ourselves with works of art as the products of emerging systems of trade and transportation, as well as works of art as reflecting social systems of memory and commemoration.

Research and technical support for this course are provided by Lee Sorensen, Librarian for Visual Studies & Dance, and Hannah Jacobs, Wired! Lab Multimedia Analyst.

The Medieval Castle in Britain

Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

ARTHIST 290S – 01

Matthew Woodworth

Fall 2016: TTH 1:25-2:40pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Fl, Rm A233)

This class investigates the evolution of the British castle from the Norman Conquest through the end of the Tudor dynasty (i.e., 1066-1603). It begins with the mighty eleventh-century ruins scattered along the coast of Wales — the greatest surviving fortifications in the world, and the inspiration for those seen in Game of Thrones and The Lord of the Rings. The course then surveys the development of British military architecture over the next five and half centuries. Dramatic changes in ground plan and topography were matched by sweeping changes in style, architectural fashion, materials, and the machinery of war. Students will use 3D modeling to map the location of castles in the British landscape, as well as make digital reconstructions (both external and internal) of how a vanished or ruinous castle would have appeared in its heyday. Formalist and technological concerns will be approached holistically and symbiotically: How did the appearance of the “ideal” castle change over time, and how did it adapt to new regimes, weapons, and economic forces? We will also investigate the historical accuracy of popular “siege engine” computer games such as Stronghold, Age of Empires, and Medieval: Total War.

The Medieval Castle in Britain (First Year Seminar): Fortresses, Technology, and Power

Spring 2015

ARTHIST 89S-02 | MEDREN 89S-01

Matthew Woodworth

Th 3:05-5:35pm| The Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

This class investigates the evolution of the British castle from the Norman Conquest through the end of the Tudor dynasty (i.e., 1066-1603). It begins with the mighty eleventh-century ruins scattered along the coast of Wales — the greatest surviving fortifications in the world, and the inspiration for those seen in Game of Thrones and The Lord of the Rings. The course then surveys the development of British military architecture over the next five and half centuries. Dramatic changes in ground plan and topography were matched by sweeping changes in style, architectural fashion, materials, and the machinery of war. Students will use 3D modeling to map the location of castles in the British landscape, as well as make digital reconstructions (both external and internal) of how a vanished or ruinous castle would have appeared in its heyday. Formalist and technological concerns will be approached holistically and symbiotically: How did the appearance of the “ideal” castle change over time, and how did it adapt to new regimes, weapons, and economic forces? We will also investigate the historical accuracy of popular “siege engine” computer games such as Stronghold, Age of Empires, and Medieval: Total War.

This course is open to first year students only. Due to popular demand, a special topics course has been created for other students. More information is available here.

Rock, Paper, Chisel: The Materiality and Context of Medieval Art

Spring 2015

ARTHIST 290-03 | MEDREN 290-1-01 | VMS 290S-01

Alexandra Dodson

TuTh 11:45am-1:00pm | Nasher 119

Medieval artworks were not made for museums. They were created as components of architectural complexes, or as equally functional objects with didactic, narrative, or other practical purposes. We will explore the historical contexts of works of medieval art, seeking to understand these works as they were meant to be seen and used. We will focus on the art of Western Europe from approximately 300-1400 AD with some consideration of that of the Middle East. Discussion of be the “lives” of the artworks we study, including illuminated manuscripts, gothic cathedrals, tombs, stained glass, and altarpieces, along with the stones and pigments that comprise them, and the tools that made them.

Visualizing Venetian Art

Spring 2015

VMS 551LS-001 | ARTHIST 551LS-001 | ISIS 551LS-001

Kristin Lanzoni

M 1:25-4:05pm | The Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

This seminar focuses on the art and architecture of Early Modern Venice. Much of the city changed over time, most notably with Napoleon’s entry into the city in 1789. Students will use the vast printed and visual resources related to history of Venice in order to develop digital projects that permit reconstructions of knowledge about its art and architecture, demolished structures, and altered spaces. These may include, but will not be limited to the annotation of historical maps and views of Venice; visualizations of different types and forms of movement into and out of the city and its empire over time and space; interactive museum exhibitions; and 3-D reconstructions of lost monuments of historical importance to the urban fabric. Student projects have the potential to contribute to ongoing Visualizing Venice research initiatives.​