Art in Renaissance Italy

Spring 2016

ARTHIST 255-01 | MEDREN 225-01 | ITALIAN 386-01

Kristin Huffman Lanzoni

Iara Dundas, TA

MW 1:25-2:40pm | Smith Warehouse, Bay 9 2nd Floor, Rm A290

This course focuses on the art and culture of Renaissance Italy, beginning in the early 15th century with the groundbreaking sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello and concluding at the end of the 16th century with the monumental projects of urban renewal in Rome. The class considers a range of artists, some well known such as Michelangelo and Titian, others less studied but who also made significant contributions to the period. An understanding of emerging Renaissance artistic ideals and a modern attitude to art is central to the subject; additionally, this class seeks to develop an awareness of the many ways in which Renaissance spectators experienced art and architecture. By opening up the Renaissance to varied perceptions and interpretative frameworks, this class moves beyond common generalizations of Renaissance individualism or Renaissance rebirth. To do this, a range of topics and issues will be explored that include important, yet at times overlooked themes in a survey course: public versus private display, “high and low” art (painting, sculpture, architecture vs. textiles, glass, ceramics, furniture), visual imagery used both to promote and subvert politically driven propaganda, foreign communities and foreign artists, women as both patrons and practitioners, centers and peripheries (cosmopolitan versus “provincial” art).

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2 on Models: History, Theory & Digital Practice

Spring 2016

HCVIS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01

Mark Olson, Annabel Wharton

T 1:25-3:55pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Floor, A233)

Matt Ratto (2011) describes critical making as “a desire to theoretically and pragmatically connect two modes of engagement with the world that are often held separate—critical thinking, typically understood as conceptual and linguistically based, and physical ‘making,’ goal-based material work” (253). Models offer a site in which making and conceptualization are inextricably interwoven. Like models themselves, this seminar brings theory and practice together. We shall develop skills both in making models and in thinking about and through models.

Student projects will both model and analyze, theoretically and historically, a site or object of their choice. Digital 3d models will be constructed and then be presented in the form of a 20-minute conference paper and then refined and elaborated as a final paper.

Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

VMS 89S

Kristin Lanzoni

Katie McCusker, TA

Spring 2016: T 10:20am-12:50pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Floor, A233)

Beginning with Napoleon’s forced entry into the city in 1797 and the fall of a more than 1000 year old Republic, the urban landscape of Venice experienced notable change. Significant intervention included the destruction of many Renaissance monuments and, therefore, great loss to the architectural and artistic patrimony of the city. The goal of this Wired! course is to map the urban landscape of early modern Venice by re-constructing lost architectural gems of the fifteenth and sixteenth century along with their immediate surroundings. To accomplish this, students will work in groups to use digital tools, such as Google Sketch up, to translate historical and modern maps, prints, engravings and paintings into 3-D models. In addition to the exterior reconstruction of the buildings, students will use inventories and various imagery to recreate interior spaces. These monuments will be mapped onto present-day Venice. The course assumes no prior art historical or digital experience; students will be provided with the background necessary to understand the art and architectural history of early modern Venice, and the skills required for the digital technology. The outcome of the course will be an unprecedented reconfiguration of aspects of Venice as it appeared in the Renaissance and visual models that may be shared with a larger academic community. This course is a First Year Seminar and is open to first years only.

The Medieval Castle in Britain

Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

ARTHIST 290S – 01

Matthew Woodworth

Fall 2016: TTH 1:25-2:40pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Fl, Rm A233)

This class investigates the evolution of the British castle from the Norman Conquest through the end of the Tudor dynasty (i.e., 1066-1603). It begins with the mighty eleventh-century ruins scattered along the coast of Wales — the greatest surviving fortifications in the world, and the inspiration for those seen in Game of Thrones and The Lord of the Rings. The course then surveys the development of British military architecture over the next five and half centuries. Dramatic changes in ground plan and topography were matched by sweeping changes in style, architectural fashion, materials, and the machinery of war. Students will use 3D modeling to map the location of castles in the British landscape, as well as make digital reconstructions (both external and internal) of how a vanished or ruinous castle would have appeared in its heyday. Formalist and technological concerns will be approached holistically and symbiotically: How did the appearance of the “ideal” castle change over time, and how did it adapt to new regimes, weapons, and economic forces? We will also investigate the historical accuracy of popular “siege engine” computer games such as Stronghold, Age of Empires, and Medieval: Total War.

Wired! The Lives of Things

Spring 2016

VMS 551SL | ARTHIST 551SL | ISIS 551SL

Caroline Bruzelius,

Sinan Goknur, TA

M 3:05-5:50pm | The Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Advanced Digital Art History. Information coming soon!