The Bauhaus

Spring 2020

ARTHIST | GERMAN | VMS 731S-01

Paul Jaskot

M 3:20-5:55pm | Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, A266

This seminar analyzes the history of the Bauhaus, from its roots in Weimar Germany to its impact on framing post World War II international Modernism. It covers major scholarship on Modernism, architecture, and design as well as central questions of twentieth-century art and politics. Grounded in the foundation and activity of the school in Germany after World War I, the seminar will also cover the spread of Bauhaus ideas, faculty, and students internationally including in Japan, Turkey, the United States, and on both sides of the Cold War.

Building Duke: An Architectural History of Duke Campus from 1924 to Today

Spring 2020 | Spring 2019

ARTHIST 504SL | HCVIS 504SL

Kristin Huffman, Hannah Jacobs

Tu-Th 3:05-5:35pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Building Duke is a research seminar and laboratory on the architectural history of Duke Campus based on original archival materials (photos, blueprints, contracts, letters, and financial records) preserved in Duke Library collections. The course explores the variety of interpretative lenses in the field of architecture history, including (but not limited to) issues of style, patronage, labor, gender, and race. It analyzes notions of cultural identity as construed by Duke founders and administrators and as imprinted on Duke Campus by its architects and landscape designers. The students will produce original research projects based on primary materials and digital visualizations of changes in the physical fabric of Duke Campus through time.

Codes: Seminar, ALP, R

 

Image Credit: Duke University Archives


Collaborators

Brittany Forniotis

Kayla Marr

Daphne Turan

Jacqui Geerdes


Projects

Building Duke


News & Events

Building Duke Becomes Bass Connections Project Team

Digital Durham

Spring 2020 | Spring 2018

ISS 356S/758S | VMS 358S | EDUC 356S | HISTORY 382S-01

Trudi Abel, Victoria Szabo

T 1:40-4:10pm | Rubenstein 350

The Digital Durham seminar is based on the idea that understanding the
past is a civic virtue. The course fosters awareness of the complexity
of Durham communities, including the interconnections of the white and
African-American communities in the past. The project lays bare
Durham’s experience of industrialization, immigration, segregation,
and urbanization and demonstrates how that history shapes the present
and the future. Students will engage with a broad array of primary
sources in the Rubenstein Library including maps, photographs, census
data and handwritten letters from the nineteenth century–and digital
tools which they will use to share and interpret historical documents.

Course Attributes:

Seminar
(R) Research
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
(W) Writing
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance

This course was part of a Bass Connections 2017-18 project.

Image Credit


Projects

Digital Durham

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

Spring 2020 | Spring 2018 | Spring 2017 | Spring 2015

HCVIS 581S-01 | ARTHIST 581S-01 | CMAC 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01

Augustus Wendell

TuTh 1:25PM - 2:40PM | Tu in Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233) | Th in Smith, Bay 12, A228

Interactivity and online content management with 2D and 3D imaging and interactive systems.  Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from the Wired! Lab and elsewhere. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration. Theoretical topics include: critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, hypermedia information design.

Proseminar 1 is not a prerequisite. This course is required for all MA in Digital Art History/Computational students.

Undergraduates:

Instructor consent required.

Attributes:

Seminar
(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
Cross-listed in another department
(ALP) Arts, Literature & Performance


Courses

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar on Models: History, Theory & Digital Practice

Mapping History with GIS

Fall 2020 |Spring 2020 | Fall 2018 | Fall 2017

ISS 315-01/715-01 | VMS 304-01 | ARTHIST 315-01

Timothy D Shea

M 10:05AM - 12:35PM | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 12, Rm A228)

This is a beginner/intermediate Geographic Information System (GIS) course designed to help students design maps and spatial diagrams of historical subjects. The class emphasizes perspectives, procedures, and tools that are relevant to art and architectural history, but students will also learn that most spatial methods are inter-disciplinary. Although geared toward art history, students from any discipline are welcome. This course is designed as a hybrid lecture/lab format in which direct instruction is supplemented by hands on learning labs using ArcGIS software and real-world spatial data. The main skills students will gain are:

· Integration of spatial and tabular data
· Geoprocessing
· Data visualization
· Creating features
· Editing Features
· Vector and Raster Integration
· Spatial Analysis
· Georeferencing

Course Attributes:

(STS) Science, Technology, and Society
Cross-listed in another department
(CZ) Civilizations