Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 2

Spring 2015, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

HCVIS 581S-01 | VMS 581S-01 | ISIS 581S-01

Mark Olson

M 1:25-3:55pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Interactivity and online content management with 2D and 3D imaging and interactive systems.  Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from the Wired! Lab and elsewhere. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration. Theoretical topics include: critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, hypermedia information design.

Proseminar 1 required. This course is required for all MA in Digital Art History/Computational students.

Topics in Digital History & Humanities: NC Jukebox

Fall 2015

ISI 317S | HIST 317S | MUS 317S

Victoria Szabo and Trudi Abel

TH 10:05am-12:35pm | Rubenstein Library

Digital History and Digital Humanities in theory and practice. Students plan, research and develop new technology projects which present archival material and historical interpretations to scholars and the general public through research papers, websites, and museum exhibits. The course meets weekly to discuss readings in American history, southern history, and digital history/humanities. Students explore archival material in the Rubinstein Library, learn how to use digital tools for humanities projects, develop principles of effective digital project management, create cross-disciplinary collaborations and learn about the ethics for creating research projects in the humanities.

This project is focused on transforming an inaccessible audio archive of historic North Carolina folk music into a vital, publicly accessible digital archive and museum exhibition. Nearly 97 years ago and into the 1930s, Frank C. Brown, a Duke scholar, began recording North Carolina folk music and archiving it for posterity. Most of those recordings are still housed on glass disks in Rubenstein Library, but we already have about 400 songs for which we have digitized audio and handwritten metadata with which we can work on the initial version of what we are calling the proof-of-concept NC Jukebox project.

For our project we envision converting this music to playable audio forms and making it accessible to the public in a variety of value-added, contextualizing digital and installation media exhibitions. We also want to prototype a database system to begin organizing and sharing the larger set of materials when they have been digitized later.

This course is part of the Bass Connections pathway Information, Society & Culture.

Visualizing Venetian Art

Spring 2015

VMS 551LS-001 | ARTHIST 551LS-001 | ISIS 551LS-001

Kristin Lanzoni

M 1:25-4:05pm | The Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

This seminar focuses on the art and architecture of Early Modern Venice. Much of the city changed over time, most notably with Napoleon’s entry into the city in 1789. Students will use the vast printed and visual resources related to history of Venice in order to develop digital projects that permit reconstructions of knowledge about its art and architecture, demolished structures, and altered spaces. These may include, but will not be limited to the annotation of historical maps and views of Venice; visualizations of different types and forms of movement into and out of the city and its empire over time and space; interactive museum exhibitions; and 3-D reconstructions of lost monuments of historical importance to the urban fabric. Student projects have the potential to contribute to ongoing Visualizing Venice research initiatives.​