Gothic Cathedrals

Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2012

ARTHIST 225-01 & 225-01L | MEDREN 215-01

Current Instructor: Edward Triplett

Past Instructor: Caroline Bruzelius

Fall 2017: TTh 11:45am-1:00pm | Perkins LINK 072 (Classroom 6)

In this course, students work in teams of 3 to create a fictional cathedral. They write a narrative and propose a program for the decoration (stained glass and portals) and architecture (ground plan, elevation, section and façade) of a cathedral situated in a specific place and time. The historical narrative begins with the Christianization of the site, and must consider access to supplies of wood and stone (students study geological maps). The fictional cathedral also needs to be located near roads, ports, or rivers in order to provide the economic basis for the project. All proposals include fictional budgets (income and expenditures) as well as an outline for the organization of the labor force.

The “master builders” in this class learn a computer-design program (AutoCad) to produce their cathedral plans and drawings appropriate in style and structure to the date and place chosen by the group. Projects are presented to a jury at the end of the semester and prizes are awarded for teamwork, project quality, and originality.

Historical & Cultural Visualization Proseminar 1

Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014

ARTHIST 580S-01 | HCVIS 580S-01 | ISS 580S-01 | VMS 580S-01

Victoria Szabo

Th 8:45-11:15am | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, A233)

Interactivity and online content management through databases, collaborative blogs, and other systems. Data visualization based on textual, image, and quantitative sources. Basic techniques for virtual reality, simulations, augmented reality, and game-based historical and cultural visualization project development. Mini-projects based on existing and new research data from the Wired! Lab and elsewhere. Best practices for digital research project planning and collaboration.Theoretical topics include: critical digital heritage, virtuality and culture, information aesthetics, hypermedia information design. Instructor consent required.

This course is a core part of the MA in Digital Art History/Computational Media.

Italian Baroque Art

Fall 2016

ARTHIST 256-001 | ITALIAN 256-001 | ROMST 256-001

Kristin Huffman Lanzoni

MW 11:45am-1:00pm | Smith Warehouse, Bay 9, A266

This course traces the development of the Italian baroque in architecture, sculpture and painting and considers a variety of themes relevant to Baroque artistic production, including: the impact of the Reformation and the Catholic Counter Reformation; economic influences; central versus peripheral trends; issues of gender and sexuality; patronage; urban planning and transformation; the artist, his workshop and rivalries; and seventeenth-century primary sources. The semester project will include a digital treatment of art historical content.

The Medieval Castle in Britain

Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

ARTHIST 290S – 01

Matthew Woodworth

Fall 2016: TTH 1:25-2:40pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11 2nd Fl, Rm A233)

This class investigates the evolution of the British castle from the Norman Conquest through the end of the Tudor dynasty (i.e., 1066-1603). It begins with the mighty eleventh-century ruins scattered along the coast of Wales — the greatest surviving fortifications in the world, and the inspiration for those seen in Game of Thrones and The Lord of the Rings. The course then surveys the development of British military architecture over the next five and half centuries. Dramatic changes in ground plan and topography were matched by sweeping changes in style, architectural fashion, materials, and the machinery of war. Students will use 3D modeling to map the location of castles in the British landscape, as well as make digital reconstructions (both external and internal) of how a vanished or ruinous castle would have appeared in its heyday. Formalist and technological concerns will be approached holistically and symbiotically: How did the appearance of the “ideal” castle change over time, and how did it adapt to new regimes, weapons, and economic forces? We will also investigate the historical accuracy of popular “siege engine” computer games such as Stronghold, Age of Empires, and Medieval: Total War.

Medieval Castles of Europe

Fall 2016

ARTHIST 190S | MEDREN 190S

Edward Triplett

TTH 1:25-2:40pm | Wired! Lab (Smith, Bay 11, Rm A233)

This special topics course investigates the evolution of medieval castles in Europe. Students will use 3D modeling to reconstruct vanished or ruinous castles as they may have appeared in their heydays.