Entries by dukewire

Statue Monuments in Historical Context

Digital visualization affords us the possibility to recreate an important aspect of the visual landscape of ancient cities that is now totally missing – the thousands of statues that once inhabited public space.  What might the process of “re-statuefying” an ancient context tell us about ancient sculpture that a de-statuefied context does not?  What are […]

Talking About Teaching in New (Digital) Times

What is knowledge?  What is the most effective way to teach?  This term “Gothic Cathedrals,” taught by Caroline Bruzelius and Todd Berreth, is experimenting with a fusion of online learning (recorded lectures on Panopto) and in-class teamwork to involve students in more a engaged and “hands-on” learning experience.  Todd and Caroline will talk about how […]

Google Maps & Google Earth

In these two sessions we will practice authoring mulit-layered Google Maps and Google Earth projects in support of digital humanities projects. We will focus on placing Sketchup 3D models in maps, text and multimedia annotation, point and polygon overlays, data imports from GIS shapefiles, online tours, and web-based map publication.

Critical Visualization Studies

For the first Get Wired @ Lunch discussion, Mark would like to explore the implications of recent critical work in visual and media studies on our modeling and mapping endeavors. His hope is that we can begin a sustained dialogue about the (hopefully productive) tensions between critical work in visual studies and our practices of […]

Visualizing Venice Wired! Workshop

This first workshop, offered by the Wired! Lab with support from Duke University’s Department of Art, Art Hiostry & Visual Studies and the Visual Studies Initiative, focused on digital visualization technology for Archaeology, Architecture, Art History, and Urbanism. The workshop was open to faculty, staff, and graduate students. Schedule: Monday, June 7 Welcome & Overview, […]

The Cathedral in the DiVE: Animating Medieval Architecture

In 2007-2008, Duke senior Charles Sparkman created a 3D model of an imaginary French medieval cathedral for a Visual Studies Fellowship. As Sparkman explains in the video below, he began developing the project first in Caroline Bruzelius’ Gothic Cathedrals course. After his model was completed, it was animated with the help of Rachel Brady and […]