Announcing the Visualizing Venice 2018 Summer Institute

September 20, 2017

The Wired! Lab and its Visualizing Venice collaborators are excited to announce a new Visualizing Venice Summer Institute: Advanced Topics in Digital Art History: 3D (Geo)Spatial Networks!

This Getty Foundation supported workshop will support interdisciplinary teams focused on the hard questions of Digital Art History as a discipline, a set of methods, and a host of technical and institutional challenges and opportunities.

Participants will gather from June 4-16, 2018 in Venice, Italy at Venice International University, with follow-up activities taking place over the course of the 2018-19 academic year, and leading into a follow-on gathering in Summer of 2019 that will operate as a writing and digital publication workshop, building upon work done over the course of the year by the project teams and in collaboration with our wider network.

We anticipate bringing together approximately 7-8 teams of 2-3 participants drawn from an international set of collaborators focused on scaling up an existing Digital Art History project, with special attention to projects focused on the intersection of mapping and modeling, and those thematized around Visualizing Cities.

Alumni/ae of our previous Visualizing Venice workshops are especially encouraged to apply.

Support for this Visualizing Venice program is provided by the Getty Foundation, as part of its Digital Art History initiative. Organizing partners include Venice International UniversityDuke University‘s Wired Lab for Digital Art History & Visual Culture, and the University of Padua‘s Architecture and Engineering program.

The workshop Teaching Team includes

Senior Advisors:

Workshop Leaders:

  • Mark Olson, Assistant Professor,  Duke University (Co-PI)
  • Victoria Szabo, Associate Research Professor, Duke University (PI)

Lecturers and Discussion Leaders:

  • Hannah Jacobs, IT Analyst and Digital Humanities Specialist, Duke University
  • Ed Triplett, Lecturing Fellow, Duke University

Guest Lecturers:

The Call for Applications will open in Fall 2017. See the workshop website for more information.

From Point Cloud to Projection Mapping: MA Student Ruby Hung’s Summer Research

August 29, 2017

In 2016, Ed Triplett gathered a group of photogrammetry-curious students, staff, and faculty to crowdsource a model of the interior of Duke’s newly renovated chapel. The project served as a training exercise for professionals and researchers seeking to learn photogrammetry techniques for both technical and humanistic endeavors–and in this 8 million point cloud model of Duke Chapel.

Now MA in Digital Art History student Ruby Hung is building her thesis out of this model as she develops a proposal for an exhibition to be viewed in the chapel’s vaulted ceiling. The proposed exhibition would be presented through projection mapping, a type of light projection that matches visual media, both image and video, to the contours of three dimensional surfaces. The project’s goals include exploring the challenge of prototyping a projection mapping project using 3D printed models, creating a medium-specific historical narrative about the chapel, and developing an exhibition that engages in a scholarly dialogue with previously documented projection mapping exhibitions in sacred spaces.

A point cloud, a collection of spatially located points created using thousands of photographs, is converted to a mesh–a 3D model formed of many triangles.

Hung spent her summer developing a 3D printed prototype of the chapel’s transept vault using a combination of Autodesk’s modeling programs Meshmixer, Fusion360, and 3D Studio Max. She has worked in consultation with Professors Mark Olson and Ed Triplett, as well as with students and staff at the Colab, to create the scaled model with which she will develop her projection mapping prototype this fall.

The mesh is prepared for printing. Hung divided the transept into 4 sections for printing.

Through this projection mapping, Hung will tell the story of the design and construction of the chapel, bringing to light the work of Julian Abele through historical materials held in the University Archives.

Two models after successful printing in the Colab.