CLIR Fellow to join Wired! Lab


Ed_T_Headshot_white_narrowThe Wired! Lab is pleased to announce that a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Visual Studies will be joining the lab in fall 2015.

Edward Triplett is a PhD candidate in the History of Art and Architecture at University of Virginia, expected to complete in spring 2015. Triplett studies the history of medieval Iberia, Medieval Spanish architecture, Digital Humanities, 3D visualization, GIS, and photogrammetry. His dissertation, “A Wall of the Faithful: Spatial Analysis of Military Order Architecture on Medieval Iberia’s Religious Frontier” is a spatial history of the Reconquista that focuses on sight as a highly valued frontier commodity.

Triplett is a Graduate Fellow in Digital Humanities at UVA’s Scholars’ Lab, where he created a custom GIS database containing over 700 architectural sites built or occupied by military orders in 12th-14th century Spain and Portugal. A second digital project processed over 30 thousand on-site photographs into 3D facsimiles of extant masonry at two composite fortress-monasteries that served as headquarters for Iberian military orders.  This ongoing project has thus far digitally reconstructed the unique 14th century fortress-monastery of Montesa so that it might act as a laboratory for 3D intervisibility experiments at a clearly partitioned military-religious complex.

Triplett has also worked as a visualization specialist at UVA’s Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities and has an MFA in 3D Animation from the Savannah College of Art and Design, an MA in History from the University of Delaware, and an MA in Architectural History from UVA. He has been awarded a two-year Postdoctoral Fellowship in Data Curation for Visual Studies by the Council on Library and Information Resources. His fellowship will be shared between Duke University Libraries and the Wired! Lab.

CLIR Fellowships are supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and provide recent PhDs with professional development, education, and training opportunities in data curation for Visual Studies. The fellows’ work must draw upon their disciplinary expertise in order to help advance data curation practices and services at their host institutions.

Visualizing Venice: The Biennale & The City Storify

The following is a public archive of the 2015 Visualizing Venice Workshop.

Visualizing Venice: The Biennale and the City

June 1, 2015 — June 12, 2015
Instructors: Caroline Bruzelius, Mark Olson, Victoria Szabo (Duke University); Donatella Calabi (University of Venice) TAs: Ludovica Galeazzo, Chiara Di Stefano (University of Venice); Hannah Jacobs (Duke University)

View the 2015 workshop’s public archive.

 

What is it about?

The field of historical and cultural visualization has grown substantially in recent years. For the past three years, Duke University, Università IUAV di Venezia, and Venice International University have collaborated on the Visualizing Venice Summer Workshops at VIU.
This year’s theme, “The Biennale and the City” reflects both the maturation of the international Visualizing Venice collaboration and the increasing accessibility of digital tools for representing change over time in urban environments. This collaboration enables us to bring together art and architectural history scholars with digital media specialists and engineers in order to create new opportunities to research and share information about the built past.
VIU is the ideal place to bring together an international set of graduate students studying digital art and art history by doing it onsite. Our unique capacity to offer courses that allow for both on site research and digital media production within a compressed time and intimate setting is unparalleled.

 

Course description

This course will teach a range of digital skills in digital mapping, 3D modeling from ground plans and photos, mobile application development, and time based media authorship to enable participants to engage historical questions with emerging digital tools.  As in the previous editions of the workshop, the technologies will be taught through the use of a theme.  The summer 2015 theme, “The Biennale and the City” allows for exploration of the history of the Venice Biennale from several perspectives and scales of reference: as a case study in architectural history in the Giardini and the Arsenale; as a set of exhibitions undertaken both on those sites and in more ephemeral sites around the city; as an aggregation of artistic forces hailing from around the world; and as a phenomenon with a profound impact upon the life and culture of the city of Venice itself.

 

The plan of the course will follow the pattern of previous years.
During the first week of the course students will learn techniques for digital production by drawing
upon existing research materials provided by colleagues in the Visualizing Venice team. Each day, students will learn about a different type of digital media production within the context of how that type of reconstruction is typically used in digital art and architectural history.
During the second week, the students will work collaboratively to create projects using the tools they have learned, with the goal of creating high-quality, public-facing research products suitable for a general audience, as well as identifying potential areas to explore in their own future research.

 

Schedule

Students will see examples and will participate in tutorial sessions around the following topics:

Day 1
Introductions and Course Overview
Historical Overview of the Biennale
Computer Orientation
Day 2
Topics in Digital Mapping – Lecture and Examples
Digital Mapping with Google Earth and Web-Based Systems
Historical GIS: Techniques for Vector Data Analysis and Geo-rectification
Data Analysis and Visualization with Tableau
Day 3
Overview of Digital Project Archive Development
Archive-Development with Omeka; Representing Change Over Time with Neatline
Biennale Library visit
Day 4
3D Modeling with Google Sketchup
Photogrammetry Techniques for Object Capture
Day 5
Augmented Reality Application Design with Metaio Creator and Map2App
VirtualWorld Construction with OpenSim
Week-end
Visit Biennale at Giardini and Arsenale
Day 6
Digital Video Production
Project Team Planning
Day 7
Collaborative project work
Day 8
Collaborative project work
Day 9
Collaborative project work
Day 10
Final project work
Presentations to the public

 

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes include: familiarity and facility with digital media production tools for digital art and architectural history; awareness of the critical and practical challenges to the fields that digital production techniques pose; understanding of the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of digital media authorship as an intervention into digital heritage and lived experience of the city.

 

Who can apply?

The workshop is designed for participants at the Ph.D – or Post doctoral – level in Interpretive Humanities (including Cultural Patrimony, History of Art, Architecture and Urbanism, History, Geography, Architecture, Archaeology, and other relevant disciplines).

Instruction will be in English of which participants must have an adequate working knowledge.

Maximum number of students: 16

 

Program structure

The course duration is 10 days. Students will attend classes in the Digital Lab 5 days per week and will participate in one field trip (during the week-end) at the Venice Biennale premises.
Participants should expect to be engaged full time in these ten days.

 

Credits

An official Duke University/Università IUAV/Venice International University joint Certificate will be issued at the end of the course.
Number of ECTS credits allocated: 3

 

Scholarships
Accepted applicants will receive a stipend to help cover travel and lodging thanks to the generosity of the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Getty Foundation.

 

Duration and Period

10 days, June 1 – 12, 2015

 

Location

San Servolo Island, Venice, Italy

 

Contacts and info:

Venice International University

Isola di San Servolo

30100 Venice

ITALY

T +39 041 2719511

F +39 041 2719510

E shss@univiu.org

 

Applications due April 24, 2015

More information and to apply: http://www.univiu.org/shss/seminars-summer-schools/visualizing-venice-summer-workshop

Download the brochure.

 

Visualizing Venice summer workshop is jointly promoted by:

Duke University

Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Duke University

Wired! Lab, Duke University

Università IUAV di Venezia

Venice International University

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Getty Foundation provide vital support.

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Maps & Models: Round up of Spring 2015 Course Projects


This spring, Wired! course projects focused on uses of mapping and modeling technologies to answer questions pertaining to art and architectural history.

In Introduction to Art History with Professor Caroline Bruzelius, students created spatiotemporal exhibits to explore movements of materials used to create various material objects throughout ancient and medieval history.

In The Medieval Castle in Britain with Dr. Matthew Woodworth, students created digital reconstructions of medieval British castles, historic or imaginary to explore political, economic, and technological influences on castle-building processes.

In Alexandra Dodson’s Rock, Paper, Chisel, students discussed materialities and contexts of medieval art. Their final projects included a digital restoration and recontextualization of a stained glass window and digital reconstructions of two damaged sculptures.

Summer Workshop Series: Introduction to Unity

May 12, 2015 — August 11, 2015
Wired! Lab (Smith Warehouse, Bay 11, 2nd Floor, A233)

12:00-2:00pm

This summer, the Wired! Lab will be hosting an informal workshop series for anyone in the Duke community interested in learning the Unity gaming engine.

Come learn Unity with a group of likeminded Unity beginners on selected Tuesdays throughout the summer. (Check the sign up form below for specific dates.) We’ll start from the very beginning by working through Lynda.com tutorials together. Then we’ll move to a needs-based approach where we’ll select tutorials specific to our interests and help each other troubleshoot our projects. Bring your lunch to munch while we learn!

Sign up: http://bit.ly/wired-unity

Contact hannah.jacobs[at]duke.edu for more information.

 

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Visualizing Venice Receives Scholarship Funding


Thanks to the generosity of the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Getty Foundation, Visualizing Venice will be offering accepted 2015 workshop participants scholarships and stipends to attend the workshop.

The field of historical and cultural visualization has grown substantially in recent years. For the past three years, Duke University, Università IUAV di Venezia, and Venice International University have collaborated on the Visualizing Venice Summer Workshops at VIU.
This year’s theme, “The Biennale and the City” reflects both the maturation of the international Visualizing Venice collaboration and the increasing accessibility of digital tools for representing change over time in urban environments. This collaboration enables us to bring together art and architectural history scholars with digital media specialists and engineers in order to create new opportunities to research and share information about the built past.
VIU is the ideal place to bring together an international set of graduate students studying digital art and art history by doing it onsite. Our unique capacity to offer courses that allow for both on site research and digital media production within a compressed time and intimate setting is unparalleled.

This course will teach a range of digital skills in digital mapping, 3D modeling from ground plans and photos, mobile application development, and time based media authorship to enable participants to engage historical questions with emerging digital tools.  As in the previous editions of the workshop, the technologies will be taught through the use of a theme.  The summer 2015 theme, “The Biennale and the City” allows for exploration of the history of the Venice Biennale from several perspectives and scales of reference: as a case study in architectural history in the Giardini and the Arsenale; as a set of exhibitions undertaken both on those sites and in more ephemeral sites around the city; as an aggregation of artistic forces hailing from around the world; and as a phenomenon with a profound impact upon the life and culture of the city of Venice itself.

Find out more.

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Wired! cosponsoring Digital Humanities Series at The Edge

The Wired! Lab is proud to be partnering with Duke Digital Scholarship Services to present the DH Sandbox Chats event series during Spring 2015. The series, open to the public, provides a venue for scholars and students to present their digital humanities projects in process. Presenters discuss not only their projects’ content but also the digital tools and methods with which they are engaging and how these technologies are contributing to the research and presentation of their scholarship.

Upcoming DH Sandbox Chats:

March 18th at 1:00pm

The Sonic Dictionary (Mary Caton Lingold / Audiovisualities Lab)

Digital Tool: Omeka

March 25th 2:00pm

Building the NULab: An open conversation on shaping digital curriculum and research for students (Ryan Cordell)

April 1st 4:00pm

One Person, One Vote  (Karlyn Forner / Humanities Writ Large Emerging Humanities Networks)

April 8th 4:00pm

Wired! Lab

Projects: Kingdom of Sicily, Digital Athens

Digital Tools: FileMaker Pro, ArcGIS, QGIS

 

Digital Scholarship Services is located in Duke University Libraries’ newest space dedicated to research, technology, and collaboration, The Edge. All DH Sandbox Chats are held in the Murthy Digital Studio, Bostock Library Level 1, West Campus, Duke University. (campus map)

Follow the series on Twitter at #dhSandbox.

MA+S Rendezvous: Wired! Full Immersion: Neatline and the Digital Syllabus

March 19, 2015
Collision Space, Bay 10, 2nd Floor, Smith Warehouse

4:15 pm

Caroline Bruzelius

Hannah Jacobs

At the beginning of each semester, students are showered with pages and pages, printed or pdf-ed, of course syllabi. Along with expectations and grading breakdowns, these contain perfunctory lists of topics covered in each course and assignments accompanying each topic. What happens when a syllabus is thought of as course material itself rather than simply a schedule or outline? What happens when it is taken from the page and placed in an interactive spatiotemporal digital environment?

For her spring 2015 Introduction to Art History course, Professor Caroline Bruzelius, along with her Teaching Assistant Joseph Williams and Wired! IT Analyst Hannah Jacobs, has transformed her syllabus into just such a teaching tool. Created as a Neatline exhibit, the syllabus includes not only the list of topics but also a timeline, maps, lecture slides, readings, and videos. Here, students can engage visual representations of their course materials before, during, and after class.

Students then use their understanding of the course material in a visual form to create their own art historical narratives. Several students will join the conversation to discuss the syllabus, their own projects, the challenges they faced when adapting textual content to Neatline, and the lessons they have learned from their experiences.

Learn more about the MA+S Rendezvous event series.

VIDEO: Simon Verity returning to Duke

Wired! Open House

January 15, 2015
Wired! Lab (A233, Bay 11, Smith Warehouse)

5:30pm

Calling all undergraduates and graduate students! Are you an art historian? An engineer? A computer scientist? Something else altogether? If you are interested in applying digital visualization tools to art historical and new media topics, if you are looking for an opportunity to collaborate directly with faculty on a research project, if you want to learn more about project management and leadership, if you are a proactive learner, you may benefit greatly from participating in a Wired! research project this spring.

To learn more about our research projects and how you can get involved, come visit our lab during our Open House Thursday, January 15th, at 5:30pm in the Wired! Lab at Smith Warehouse. Driving directions can be found here. From East or West campuses, you can take the Smith bus to Smith Warehouse, or you can take any of the buses that pass along campus drive, get off at Maxwell Drive and walk up the hill to the warehouse. Entering through Bay 12, you will find the lab in Bay 11 on the second floor.

Independent study and fellowship opportunities are available for both undergraduate and graduate students. To find out more about why you should become part of Wired!, read this.

We hope to see you there!

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